I tried to add discussion earlier. It disappeared. Forgive me if this a repeat.

I was in a nursing home in MA for a few months recovering from accident injuries. The nurses and doctors there knew very little about treating diabetes. They would take a test before a meal, give me CI -covering insulin, but no MI -meal insulin. So of course, my bg would go up. Then the cycle would start again. The nurses didn't seem to know what I was talking about. I spoke with the head nurse who said they did not know how many carbs were in any one meal! It came to me just labeled "diabetic." When I explained it to one nurse, she was shocked, "What if you want seconds?" I was in too much pain and very weak, so didn't have much fight. I asked a friend to bring my homolog to me, but the nurse said if I medicated myself they could not treat me.
Later, when I mentioned this to my surgeon and nurse, they just rolled their eyes- like What do you expect? Recently I mentioned this to my endo doctor and nurse. They said all nursing homes are like this. A friend who is a hospital nurse agreed.
The NH is a large, modern, well-respected one in this area.
As most NH patients are T2 or T1, it still concerns me many months later.
Do any of you pros have insight or opinions? I'm not a pro, but I couldn't find a better group to bring this up.

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Replies to This Discussion

which nursing home were you at??? I use to work in one and I had to train the staff all about the diabetes as I told them I am a diabetic. Some of the staff were like we know what we are doing. I argue back with no you dont. I am much better at it than you guys. They also didnt do the carb:insulin ratio right either. They also did blood pressure during a meal when your suppose to wait 15 mins or so after a meal before you take it. You can PM me...i was a CNA at a nursing home and at a hospital in Boston. I was in the hospital in January and the nurse (who I worked with down the street and she worked at both hospital) let me take care of my diabetes all by myself.

I was at Linda Manor in Leeds, just outside Northampton. I liked it except that no one understood diabetes. I should write to the director and suggest a diabetes training session. Diabetes is more complicated to understand and take care of in a big setting like that. The patient should have an endo dr or nurse working with them. It may result in fewer amputations.Being able to control your own is great. I doubt too many NH would make that a policy.

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