On average, how long do your Enlite sensors last and is it safe to wear them beyond 6 days?
My last sensor lasted 13 days and I took it out because I didn't want to risk scar tissue or an infection. The readings were still very close to my meter and it is hard to throw a sensor out when it is working so well.

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Mine are usually of of whack with my meter anywhere from10-14 days, with no apparent side effects (ie scar tissue)I've been using them like this since they were available in Canada
Jeff

I've only been using them for 2 months, but my sensors begin to get a little whacky after a week or so. I get lost signals, lost sensors, etc. I've tried reconnecting the existing sensor to get a few more days out of it, but that doesn't usually last too long. I'm sure mileages vary based on lots of variables, but that's been my experience.

Keith

same here. lots of lost signals, lost sensors, etc. usually starting half way though day 5

I'm surprised at how long cgm users utilize their sensors. I remember when cheating to 6 days was frowned upon by the fda. I'm concerned about the life of the transmitter as well. I've heard that if you use them till their dead, they are no good anymore. And yes the readings tend to get a little wonky after 6 days. I use mine for 6-7 days. 7 to meet a more realistic time to start a new one. Not at 5pm when the first 6 days quits.

I regularly use mine for up to 10 days. I have to charge the transmitter after about 7 days though.

I find most sensors will work right up to the end but some will get a bit wacky after a week or so. I'm putting this down to the indiviual sites themselves as opposed to the sensors. Some get more wear and tear than others! :)

I just started my son on the medtronic sensor and sensor and at the day 6 it dies, what are some tips to get it restarted? Thanks'

As long as you have a good ISIG number, you are good to start it again as a new sensor. I get lost sensor errors all the time, depending how I am wearing the pump. Generally I like to see something in the teens or twenties.. If the ISIG number drops too low, the sensor is done. I have had sensors last from three days to 14 days depending on a number of factors.

I just started my son on the medtronic sensor and sensor and at the day 6 it dies, what are some tips to get it restarted?


It depends on what you mean when you say "it dies".

If you mean that you get the Sensor End alert, then all you have to do, as Graeme said in his post, is to do another Start Sensor New.

However, as Aoife said in the post just before yours, the transmitter battery will die after 6 to 7 days use. So before you restart it, you want to gently, very gently remove the tape securing the MiniLink transmitter so you can disconnect, charge, and then reconnect it. If you can't pull off the MiniLink's overtape, then consider possibly cutting the tap to remove it. After all, you're just going to retape anywhere if you can charge & reconnect it.

The key thing to remember is to try to disturb the sensor as little as possible while removing & later reconnecting the transmitter.

After the MiniLink has been recharged you should be able to restart the sensor and (hopefully) get another six days out of it.

-irrational john
T1 LADA since roughly 1980; first pump: Minimed 507, currently using Minimed 723 + CGM

I get the sensor end alert, then I shut the sensor off in the pump for about 20 min while I recharged the transmitter, reconnected but it only lasted one more day, so a total of 7 days. Then it would not reconnect. I will check the ISIG number next time. Thanks for advice everyone

I get the sensor end alert, then I shut the sensor off in the pump for about 20 min while I recharged the transmitter, reconnected but it only lasted one more day, so a total of 7 days. Then it would not reconnect.

There is no need to turn the sensor off in the pump while charging the MiniLink unless that is your preference to avoid alerts. I have always left it on and then just restarted it.

When you say the transmitter lasted only one more day after it was recharged, what sort of failure did you see at that time?

It's possible the sensor had a problem, but that feels less likely to me. Make sure to not disturb the sensor when removing the MiniLink. When you first insert the sensor apply the overtape so that it is holding the sensor taut against the skin.  As much as is reasonably possible you want to prevent the sensor probe from shifting around.

For whatever it's worth, here's a link to the sensor insertion instruction vid I have liked the most of the ones I've seen so far. The presenter spends extra time on overtaping the sensor which I'm beginning to think is more important than I realized at first.

    Enlite insertion vid from UCLH dated Aug 16, 2013 

-irrational john
T1 LADA since roughly 1980; first pump: Minimed 507, currently using Minimed 723 + CGM

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