I have changed my pump site for a third time tonight because I hit a vein the first two times. Are there any trick to avoid this? All three sites were on my abdomen, away from my belly button, and at least a month since the were used last. The hurt, and I feel like I've ruined a potential site long-term. Thanks.

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It is kind of hard and tricky to avoid the bleeder. I believe everyone have a different body type and it is just a matter of experience and knowing your body. For example, I know 2 places on my abdomen that are bleeder areas, I do my best to staying away from them, but some times I do hit them! Best of luck
Angivan,

I have only hit a bleeder once over 5 years of pumping, and never during 25 years of MDI

I stay on the fatter areas of my appendages (and the spare tire), If you slap the area you are looking at before
you insert, you may see the vessels and arteries rise, You may have to put on a tournequet to see where the blood lies.
Don't forget to take the turny off! Mark on a chart, or draw on your body where the blood is. You may at some point go through a small one, and not realize it until you pull the infusion set, and you see blood. You could talk to your doc, or the next time you go to dracula, have them show you where the best places for NOT hitting a vein may be.

Keep track on a body picture.
Had the same problem yesterday. The longer I'm on the pump the more problems I have with sites. Some locations are gettign toughened even though I switch locations. Any solutions would be appreciated, especially since Medicare only supplies enough infusion sets to cover a three month period.
Ditto for me, folks.....I'm having more and more difficulty getting my sensors in. Between bleeders and losing them from heat and perspiration, it's been an expensive summer for maintaining sensors. Like the rest of you, looking forward to reading suggestions for more success.
I have experienced bleeders nearly every time I have tried to use my abdomen. And only in my abdomen. Additionally, those bleeders tend to turn into painful hematomas for me. As a result, I just don't use it. I stick to my thighs and tush and have for the last 11 years on the pump. I couldn't even do shots in my stomach during the 19 years before the pump! Good luck.
In the past, I have had trouble with bleeders and with sites not working as I get "no delivery" after a site has been changed. I have had three C-sections and other abdomenal surgeries to have a lot of scar tissue. So, often a new site would bend the cannula and make it impossible for the insulin to deliver.

A couple years ago I switched infusion sets from Quick Set to Sure-T and that has helped me have better luck with both problems, the "no delivery" and the bleeder problem. I'm not sure why this has helped but I have a couple theories:

I think the metal needle of the Sure T must punch through the bleeder vein but that is only a guess.
As for hitting scar tissue, I'm guessing the same, that the metal needle can deal with the tough tissue while the plastic cannula would bend. I've also wondered if I may have been allergic to the plastic cannulas as I would often have itching issues and raised red hard bumps left after I removed the insertion set.

I occasionally will have a bleeder or "no delivery" but both problems rarely happen. Before, I had issues all the time.
Hey Kelsey,
Silly question but when you use your tush, how to you go about your day and sitting down without pulling it out. Also, a question for all as I am looking to go on the pump and have lots of bleeders with my MDI's, but how do you know you have hit a bleeder? Does the blood flow back into your tubing? However, MOST times when I have a bleeder or a bruise, this has not impacted my blood sugar (95%) of the time.
Couple of questions..I saw someone else asked as well.. How do you sit, bend etc... without pulling it out?? How do you do it yourself?? My trainer couldn't really give me answers to these questions..
I have had a few gushers over the years. Most of the time when I take them out. Once blood shot across the bedroom, and the wife was fairly upset to say the least. I do all in the kitchen now. You are right about staying away from your belly button. There are lots of nerves there and it hurts. It's impossible to know exactly where you can get a bleeder, which is anywhere. I also put a small circular bandage on a previous site and let it stay on for a few days. It can be a reference point for future site choices. .Of course, follow your trainer's advice about site rotation. They are trained to look at you for the best sites. I can't see ya! :) Hang in there!
Ok, I am joking here ; ), but my first thought is gain weight! I have never had a bleeder, but I am not skinniny, so I have lots
of "protection."
have you tried other insertion sets? I was on silhouette for the longest time because I was in denial and thought I was still 'athletic'. I switched to quickset and found things are a bit better.
Oh my! I don't want a bleeder! I just got my pump delivered in the mail and I am still in reading, looking, reading and more reading mode trying to make sense of all this...I am excited AND scared to try this. I got the MM pump 523, CGM, Minilink and Carelink. This is all new to me, but I have seen how it all works, when it does... I'll keep reading and watching Utube videos and ask the trainer questions. I know I will be a pro at it someday, I will get the hang of it. I just have to do it several times and figure out the pump with all the settings - that will take a long time to get all the adjustments down. Is it the MiniLink that some people are leaving injected for 10-20 days? I thought that needs to be changed 3 days also? Yeah @Mike! I'm changing mine in the kitchen too!

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