Sorry if you are seeing this twice, I just found the Oh! Baby! forum. For those who have been pregnant and have type 1, how early in your pregnancy did you see your blood sugars being effected by the baby? Were there signs before you even had a positive test?

I've had T1D for close to 24 years and my A1C is 5.7 - just investigating information. Thank you!!!

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Straight away. At conception/implantation my BG went really high, a couple of days later I had a positive HPT. After that everything went crazy. As soon as the highs were dealt with, I started having crazy lows. I fought lows until inulin resistance kicked in in the third trimester.

early on I would drop very low for no apparent reason. I even had to cut back my basals and carb ratios a bit. Not sure if that happened before I got a positive test or not. I did notice that I was going to the bathroom more frequently (esp at night) the few days before I took a test. I think I got a positive on day 28, so figure on day 26 or so I started urinating more frequently. The first 2-3 months I had really low BG a lot of the time. 3-5 months I leveled out a bit. Now, at almost 6 months I am noticing a lot of insulin resistance starting, especially at night and in the mornings.Hope that helps and good luck.

Hey there! For me when I have my period my sugar goes crazy, mostly I have trouble with highs so I didn't notice a real change until I would say about 8-10 weeks. I started having lows a lot. I would have lows just about everyday and at least a couple nights a week in the middle of the night. I would say the worst of the lows were in the second trimester and early third. By the time I reached around 32 weeks I had less trouble with lows and more trouble with my sugar going a little higher then it should have. I was able to maintain the control though and had an A1C of 5.8% the day I had my daughter. I also had dawn phenominon that started to get pretty bad around 27 weeks or so...I would get up early in the morning to take my Humalin N and have my breakfast which pretty much took care of that. Congrats and good luck to you!

My blood sugars went very high about two weeks after conception, a week before I got a positive pregnancy test. I also got sick then, so I thought the hyperglycemia was related to being sick, but now I think the illness and the hyperglycemia were related to being pregnant. I increased my basal rates at least once a day for the first few days. Then at some point I started having more lows, which continued throughout the first trimester.

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