Hi all -
I'm just at the 18 week mark now. Things have been going pretty well so far but the last few days I've been feeling really stressed. My A1Cs have been good (low 5's) but I feel like my sugars have been creeping up the last few days/weeks. Since my A1Cs have been good I've forgiven myself for the occasional high but now I feel like they are happening more often, or daily. I've been sick this week so that hasn't helped - but I've hit the 200s a few times this week alone and feeling panicked. That 120 maximum is starting to feel so elusive...
Any words of wisdom or advice? I feel like I'm getting so stressed about this that I'm not as excited about the baby anymore - all I can think about is if I'm hurting it...

Thanks for listening...

Views: 130

Replies to This Discussion

Hi Laura,
Give yourself a break Hun seems like your doing more then enough to keep your little one safe,trust me stressing about it just makes it worse.
I have learnt over the years to do what I can and whatever happens happens no matter if we worry or stress about it.
Do something for yourself because you matter just as much if not more then the little bundle of joy inside of you.xxxx

Thanks so much for the reminder, Osob! You're totally right. Just needed to hear that from someone in the community.

Hi Laura,
I'm brand new here, and don't have all the incredible experience of many of the other ladies here, but am in a similar place as you, so thought I'd leave a note. I'm 20 weeks pregnant with my first, and can definitely relate to where you are. I never really experienced or struggled with any highs until a few weeks ago (the control I had earlier on was very good, partly a gift from pregnancy hormones I guess?). Before, if I ever peaked at 150-160 after a meal, I would always come down very quickly afterwards. But lately I've been having some very stubborn BGs, a few close to 200. It's sooo stressful, I can relate. Obviously we know that insulin needs can start to increase sometime in the 2nd trimester, so I feel like I've been watching and waiting for that. Only thing is that I don't see a consistent pattern yet, where some days I have these highs, and some days I don't. My endo said your insulin needs can go up and down at this stage, before they consistently go up. Great - that makes it super easy, huh?

Anyway, what I've been doing the last week or so is doing a temp basal of +20%, so I can easily turn it off if I start to run on the lower side for a few hours. It's not a perfect fix, but it has helped. Every day is definitely a new challenge. Not sure about you, but if I were sick, I'd easily be in the 200's, so don't underestimate that either.

Like I said, I have no more experience at this than you do (only by 2 weeks I guess!), but it sounds like you've had amazing control, and it seems that everyone here keeps saying that all you can do is your very, very best, and then you have to just keep moving forward. SO much easier said than done, as I've had PLENTY of stressful moments and days, but we can try to follow their advice.

Obviously, talk to your endo too, as I'm sure they'll have some good ideas for you. BTW, looks like you're in NYC? Out of curiosity, who do you see there? I live in Montclair, NJ, but used to go to Dr. Sobel at NYP/Cornell.

Anyway, best of luck to you, and I hope you feel better.

Sarah

Thanks for the reply Sarah. Interesting that things are going to be up and down for a few weeks. Fun stuff ;) Now that I'm finally over the cold, my sugars have been more predictable but some random (like middle of the night) minor highs are making me think that I'm in a new phase.
I'm still super susceptible to lows - especially b/c of exercise and general activity so not sure I feel comfortable with the 20% + basal all the time but maybe in a few weeks?

I'll message you privately about my docs.

Thanks so much for your message and kind words!

RSS

Advertisement



REsources

From the Diabetes Hands Foundation blog...

Meet The 2014 Big Blue Test Grant Recipients

  This year Diabetes Hands Foundation has pledged US$35,000 in Big Blue Test grants, continuing its support for programs aimed at providing lifesaving supplies, medical tests, treatment, and patient education to people living in need who have or at risk Read on! →

Kim Vlasnik: The Patient Voice

  Kim Vlasnik, you NAILED it! In this video, Kim Vlasnik takes our breath away as she describes what its like to be a person with diabetes. Fortunately, Stanford’s Medicine-X Conference gives ePatients, like Kim, a chance to speak since we carry the Read on! →

Diabetes Hands Foundation Team

DHF TEAM

Manny Hernandez
(Co-Founder, Editor, has LADA)

Emily Coles
(Head of Communities, has type 1)

Mila Ferrer
(EsTuDiabetes Community Manager, mother of a child with type 1)

Mike Lawson
(Head of Experience, has type 1)

Corinna Cornejo
(Development Manager, has type 2)

Desiree Johnson  (Administrative and Programs Assistant, has type 1)

DHF VOLUNTEERS


Lead Administrator

Brian (bsc) (has type 1)


Administrators

Lorraine (mother of type 1)
Marie B (has type 1)

DanP (has Type 1)

Gary (has type 2)

David (has type 2)

 

LIKE us on Facebook

Spread the word

Loading…

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.

© 2014   A community of people touched by diabetes, run by the Diabetes Hands Foundation.

Badges  |  Contact Us  |  Terms of Service