I have been using the OmniPod since August 1, 2011 and have been having some serious issues with occlusions.

I first used the OmniPod on my thigh, and was able to rotate spots and legs for about 2.5 months before I had too much scar tissue built up to even try anymore. I called OmniPod about it and quite frankly, they weren't very nice about it: told me to find another location. OK.

I then started placing pods on my lower back. This has been succesful until about a month ago, when I noticed that during my second bolus (whenever that came) an occlusion was detected and - insert alarm noise here. Depending on the location, I would get anywhere from 2 hours to 2 days wear - never, ever getting to empty the pod on my 3rd day.

So, I switched to my upper arms. And - occlusions detected right away. I guess after 29 years of injections, those are a no go. Back to lower back, with alarms happening at any time.

I'm too self-conscious to put one of those huge pods on my abdomen. Not gonna happen.

OmniPod did tell me that lean body types have this problem. However, there doesn't seem to be a solution! I'm now thinking of going off the OmniPod but I had a bad 6-year long experience with a different pump (tubed) and I really really don't want to go back on one of those. I am trying to get pregnant right now, and obviously want the best for my body - and I'm not sure injections is the best way to go, either.

With all the occlusions (and of course, the pods that malfunction about once a week) my control is slipping and I feel like I need help. Does anyone have any solutions or suggestions for me?

Thanks!

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Massaging the areas that I wear my pods has seemed to prevent scar tissue for me so far. And I've read that you can reduce scar tissue with some massage techniques. It is worth a try or looking into. I'm pregnant right now, and control was so difficult with my last pregnancy (last year) when I didn't have a pump. The pump is making it so much easier to manage this time around. I know you don't want to, but you may want to rotate in the abdomen. I don't like wearing mine there at all, but I rotate it in.

Some people just don't do well with the angled canula that the pod has. Sounds like you might do better with 90 degree infusion sets.

Sorry, probably not the answer you were looking for, but I've been on the pod since 2008 and you are the 4th person I've run across on various forums that has consistently bad luck with malfunctioning pods. The others switched pumps and infusion set types and are much happier.

In your case I would choose a tubed pump: it has more set choices and for a pregnancy you need reliability. Your body will change, you will have to choose sites, I would go tubed.

If you can, prepare for a CGM, during pregnancy it would be a lot usefull.

PS: I would like to have omnipod, but in Italy it's not available. I think 10% pod issues (once a month) can be managed normally but not during pregnancy.

I'll send you my OmniPod!! I went off it just after my post here, when the canula had fallen out and I was over 400 almost instantly. I went to fill a new pod, and it never beeped after being filled, so I had to fill ANOTHER pod (almost a whole bottle of insulin wasted) and that pod alarmed while being filled. Then my PDM had a stuck key. I was done. I am done. No more.

I did just speak with a Medtronic representative about the Minimed Revel, which syncs wirelessly with a CGM. As much as I hated my first experience with a tubed pump, I desperately want a healthy pregnancy and this may be the way to do it.

Thanks for the advice!

MEW-Lion Am sorry you are having so much problems. A pod that doesn't beep does not mean a bad pod. I have had that and just ignore the lack of noise. If it primes it works. As for losing the insulin, you just remove the canula cap and pull out what you just put in. Had a few stuck keys but caused no problem.No need to waste any insulin.I too have had a cannula pull out but usually after a major trauma. And it usually takes me a good two hours and at least one correction before I figure it out. MEW I have never tried a cgm but for you it sounds like a good idea.I am sorry for all your frustrations they can be worked out but you need to do what is best for you. Good luck.

I am meeting with my OmniPod trainer this afternoon, but it's more of an "exit interview" so she can find out exactly what happened. I am done with the OmniPod and have already been in touch with Medtronic about the Revel and a CGM. I'm waiting now to find out if my insurance will cover it, since it's my 2nd pump in less than 1 year.
I'm hoping Insulet will take back my extra pods, but it's not like there are a ton since I've had so many failures.

Good luck and best wishes.

What works for me. Durning insertion push down gently on the heel of the pod. When it inserts release.By doing that the angle of insertion is less. When I remove the pods the cannula looks like the one on the demo that never saw a body. I mostly do arms and seldom have a problem. I have been pushing the Kineso tape to keep from knocking them off on door frames to anyone who has had that problem which is anyone that wears them. Can't help on the scar tissue as I don't have any. As for 29 years as a problem with your arms,you are a new bee I did MDI for 47 years and wen't on the pod 3 years ago. I have had many of the problems that other folks have had with the pods but have resolved all of them. Seldom have a pod failure and almost always make a full three days. Had to change insulin as the Apidra lost it's ginger the last 12 hours. Novalog has been better. I wish you well' on your pod mechanics and your family plans. Take care

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