Today I was silently watching my 3yr old T1 (dx 6 mos ago) play with her doll. She was making her something to eat and the conversation went something like this:

S: "Baby, I am making your breakfast. You hungry? You want cereal? Mom, you know my baby has diabetes?"
ME: Really? Sometimes that happens to people, doesn't it?
S: Ya. Ok baby, I make you cereal. First we have to read this box to see how many carbs... it says little bit of carbs. (then she walked over to the counter, put her baby's bowl on the scale and punched some numbers into the calculator) There, now we can eat, baby.

Moments like this give a swell of emotion. I am so proud of her that at 3 yrs old and only 6 months into this, she has such a understanding of whats going on. We are literally the Duggars of Dolls in our house and I think every one has T1. They have all been subjected to pretend insulin and sugar checks. She hugs them and comforts them when the dolls cry and tell her they don't want to have diabetes anymore. (a common theme)On the other hand, it breaks my heart that this has become normal play for her. I hate that at 3 she knows and understands the word carb means(among other D terms). When looking for a snack she asks if "that have too many carbs for me?" If I say it does, she replies with "you know pickles have no carbs?". Sheesh!

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It is interesting to see how much we all have in common. My daughter who is 7 dxd at 6 ( just a year ago) plays school with her little sister and they have diabetics in their class - I will listen from the living room because I think it will give me a glimpse into how it impacts her at school. Then my youngest who is now 5 when she is home alone playing while others are at school she will always add in diabetes to her play - with food adding or shots or glucose testing - and she isn't diabetic. I think these are just ways that they are dealing with their new realities of life - it does bring me to tears some days though!

I remember looking at Aly when she was diagnosed at 2.5 and thinking how? why? We are now 5 years into this roller coaster ride and I have seen her do the same things with her dolls. Like you said it is touching but heart wrenching at the same time. Our children will never get the "normal" (if there is such a thing) childhood.

Diabetes is definitely a emotional roller coaster

That is what is weighing me down today - they will never get the "normal" childhood.

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