My daughter was dx 6 months ago at the age of 3. She cannot tell (or tell me) when she feels low or high. The highs, although not ideal, I can deal with, but its the lows that worry me. She doesn't act differently so I cannot tell when she is low. I have tested her at times when she seems overly emotional etc and almost always she is in range. Its the pre meal checks when the number comes up on the meter and is low, and it surprises me. When I ask her if she feels funny or different she just tells me she feels "normal". So my question is, when did your child finally identify when he/she felt low? And it will eventually happen, right? She won't always be hypo- unaware?

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Anyone??

My child was diagnosed 6 months ago at the age of 4. The same things are happening to us. She has told us a few times that she feels silly, but recently hasn't, and we have had some pretty dangerous lows. If it weren't for a routine check, I don't know what would have happened. I guess I'm not helping you, but am experiencing the same thing, and my daughter is now 5.

I think it's different for each kid at different stages of childhood. My 6 yr old was dx'd at 2yrs old. I always tell him what his number is and to take note of how he is feeling. He has his good and bad times of visually seeming off to me or being able to actually feel the difference. He has gotten in the 30's and neither of us noticed anything. again he has been in the mid sixties and really verbalized that he felt low. I am currently trying to get him on a cgm to have better control, but to answer your question it's really not a thing you can predict if she will be able to feel her lows. I would defiantly bring up the subject next time you have an endo visit.

It is really hard when they are little and completely different than managing as they get older, in my opinion. My son was dx at 20 months (he is 11 now). When he was a toddler, he finally told me when he was low he felt 'wobbly' From that point on we have asked him, 'how's your head?' to get him to stop and think about how he feels. Now that he is older, it is less that and more 'I'm starving!'

The other thing we noticed when he was little, which seems totally counterintuitive, is that he often got unusual bursts of energy when he was going low. We refer to it as bouncing off the walls. Hard to discern in an active little boy, but it was above and beyond normal.

When he was small, he could drop 200 points in an hour, so we became very vigilant.
Not realizing or being able to verbalize lows started us down a path of testing religiously every 2 hours, in addition to before meals and whenever he was acting 'off.' We would often catch lows he didn't know he was having. For us it has become a bit more stable since he hit about 7 or 8. He still can have crazy numbers, but the swings don't seem quite as dramatic as they were in the early days. Hang in there!

I just read this. It makes me feel so much better. MY 23 month old was diagnosed at 15 months. We are struggling. Sometimes he will say/sign low and we will catch. Yesterday he was out running and playing and I brought him in and he was 36!!!! The lowest I've ever seen. This post makes feel like things will get better.

They will get better. It is funny, my son has been as low as 24 (to my horror) and still acting relatively normal, but the has been in the 50s and can act extremely low. Those early years are just challenging.

Hang in there!

Mine was diagnosed at 23 months and is now 7, and during some point during that time he developed the ability to feel low and tell me. He's not always right, but close enough. It will get better! I tried to look for other symptoms: sweating, fussing, wanting to be with me, wanting to eat...
He hasn't yet developed the ability to wake up when low however; according to my endocrinologist that should happen within a couple years.
Every year it gets easier...

Good afternoon:

My daughter was diagnosed last year on August 1, 2011 when she was 3 years old and she just turned 4 in April. The times that she has felt low, she tells me her legs hurt, or she ask for a snack or ask for her bedtime pal because she is sleepy. This does not happen all the time. Normally, I check her 2 hours after she was injected and see what her number is and also 3 hours after because she still drop between the 2 hour and 3 hour mark. If she is very active like the playground or party, I test her every 1/2 hour. I hope it gets better but maybe the glucose monitor system might work although I do not have it for my daughter or you can invest in a DAD which is a diabetic alert dog that will alert when she is high or low. They are amazing. I am thinking of getting one but when my daughter is a little older.

Regards,
Arianna Lamosa

My daughter was diagnosed at 4 years old she is 7 now. When she was first diagnosed I would call it her Jekkyl and Hyde syndrome. The first time it happened in a second, she was fine one min. and the next she was screaming about how hungry she was and nothing would make her stop. I remember the first time (in church) she turned to me and said "Mommy I feel low" I almost died. Now she knows how she feels and will verbalize it. There are people who are hypo-unaware (i think that is how you say it)but I think that at this age TEST TEST TEST is the best answer. You may get to know the signs yourself. I am usually able to look at my daughter as her cheeks become really red and her face looks pale and I can usually tell sometimes before her what is going on. She also will be VERY emotional. You may get to know the signs before she does and like someone else suggested when you see a low ask her how she is feeling and maybe this will help her to realize she is a little off and what that may mean.

Every kid is a little bit different. Our son Sebastien was diagnosed at 16 months old. On his 2nd birthday, he told us he felt low and sure enough he was. Now he is 3 and a half and sometimes he tells us but not always. We always tell him how his sugar is when we check him. So if he's low I'll say something like "Sebastien your sugar is low. Do you feel a little funny? This is how it feels to be low."

My daughter was diagnosed 6 months ago at 5.5 years old and she has recognized her lows from the get go, at first she just told us she felt funny. We'd test and she'd be low. Then she recognized that feeling as specifically having low BS and now she tells us she is low. Her main complaint is that her legs feel shaky. She also gets super pale, so sometimes I can tell before she can by how she looks.

Aly was about 5/6 (she is 8) when she could verbalize the way she was feeling in relation to her being high/low, she was dx'd at 2.5. There are still times that she will not feel a low/high which is when she is playing hard but for her it was around 5/8

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