I'm going to Spain for 8 days in a few weeks and am on a pump. I'm a bit concerned about the 6 hour time change. I've only done a 2 hour shift and only for a few days. Any tips from veteran travelers?
I recently met a fellow type 1 who was visiting Boston from Spain, and she suggested shifting my pump one hour ahead every day for 2 days before and then do the big 4 hour shift when I land? Does this sound OK?

Views: 37

Replies to This Discussion

Hola Jackie! I just change my pump clock to my destinations time setting as soon as the plane takes off from this side of the pond. And just check my BG's abit more often to make things are alright. Don't expect as tight a control as you usually do over the next few days until your body adjusts. The main thing is to HAVE FUN over in Spain! The food is fantastic (check out the tapas bars), the wines, oh how I envy you!!! I lived there for a year (Albacete - a few hours south of Madrid).
Hi Jackie,

I make the exact same time change frequently. During the flight, every couple hours I move it two hours until I reach the correct time of the destination.

My endo suggested this method so that I would gradually move into my new basal rate. If you don't have many different basal rates, then it won't really make too much of a difference if you do it all at once or gradually. In any case, I check my blood sugar regularly during the trip-- so you can catch any lows or highs caused by changing the basal.

Enjoy your trip!

I fly between 1-3 time zones every other week and do the same ar FatCatAnna and change my Meter, Pump, and Watch as soon as we hit 10,000 feet. I then do a Test in 2 hrs just to have my pump begin to reset teh baseline as I have had trouble with Moving numbers during flight.

I just leapt 12 hrs into the future flying from the east coast to Asia. People also recommended the change a little bit at a time in advance to me. I was however worried about how that would mess with things while at home. I ended up moving it up while on the plane. So far so good.

I'm basically making the same jump you did Katie and will be doing so without a pump (I'm a new DX T1, so I'm just on Levemir and Novolog at the moment). I have 10:30 PM basal of 18 units every night and I was thinking that I just keep on my same home schedule since I'm only on one basal shot and allow my body to adjust to the time change and bolus at my meals as needed.

In other words, I would keep a 24-hour spacing on my basal shots so what was a 10:30 PM basal becomes about a 10:30 AM basal.

Is that feasible or is that just a dumb idea?

RSS

Advertisement



REsources

From the Diabetes Hands Foundation blog...

Meet The 2014 Big Blue Test Grant Recipients

  This year Diabetes Hands Foundation has pledged US$35,000 in Big Blue Test grants, continuing its support for programs aimed at providing lifesaving supplies, medical tests, treatment, and patient education to people living in need who have or at risk Read on! →

Kim Vlasnik: The Patient Voice

  Kim Vlasnik, you NAILED it! In this video, Kim Vlasnik takes our breath away as she describes what its like to be a person with diabetes. Fortunately, Stanford’s Medicine-X Conference gives ePatients, like Kim, a chance to speak since we carry the Read on! →

Diabetes Hands Foundation Team

DHF TEAM

Manny Hernandez
(Co-Founder, Editor, has LADA)

Emily Coles
(Head of Communities, has type 1)

Mila Ferrer
(EsTuDiabetes Community Manager, mother of a child with type 1)

Mike Lawson
(Head of Experience, has type 1)

Corinna Cornejo
(Development Manager, has type 2)

Desiree Johnson  (Administrative and Programs Assistant, has type 1)

DHF VOLUNTEERS


Lead Administrator

Brian (bsc) (has type 2)


Administrators

Lorraine (mother of type 1)
Marie B (has type 1)

DanP (has Type 1)

Gary (has type 2)

David (has type 2)

 

LIKE us on Facebook

Spread the word

Loading…

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.

© 2014   A community of people touched by diabetes, run by the Diabetes Hands Foundation.

Badges  |  Contact Us  |  Terms of Service