There have been many times when I felt scared or discouraged by diabetes.

Tonight, I am terrified.

The results of my 24-hour urine test for protein came back. Not good. Not good at all.

One line says: "UR MICROALBUMIN, TIMED". The value was 11.0 mg/dl (normal range: 0.0-1.9).

Another line says: "UR MICROALBUMIN 24 HOURS". The value was 140.3 mg/24 hours (normal range: 0.0-29.9).

My endo's message on my home phone was short (I live with my parents): "Your urine results suck. Bye." (This is typical of him, and I'm not upset at all. I'm just a little miffed no one told me - until 10 pm - that my doctor called.) I hope to talk to him tomorrow and find out how to beat this. Or stop this. Or slow this. Or something.

Maybe I'm freaking out for nothing. But, c'mon, 140 is almost 5 times the highest point of the normal range!

I'm scared tonight. I'm terrified. Diabetes has never before made me cry.

Tonight, it has.

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Replies to This Discussion

first things first. There's always light at the end of the tunnel. You'll get some more tests done and you'll get things under control and maintained. They have meds, diet, and all sorts of tricks if you need it. But, the best advice, is don't worry till you have to. Talk to your Doc about the tests.

Next step, how are your sugars? PPs? Trends? I'm one of those people that thinks that we can achieve normal BGs and that it's the best (and only) thing to deal with any aliment we suffer from. My BGs were all over for years and have only gotten tight over the past few years, All is stable. That's your goal if things are not stable. It may take a good deal of change, be ready. For me personally, I'll do whatever it takes.

That leads into maintaining good tight flat control. I had a good resident tell me once that a chronic disease needs a chronic cure. Keep at it. Get your A1C as normal as possible for as long as possible.

I wish you all the best. Hopefully a TuDer with more relevant experience can chime in with some advice.

This test is one I'm not all that familiar with. Sure, I've had it done many times, I'm just not sure what the meaning of it is. But it should be done fasting, I'm pretty sure, so if you weren't, then maybe the results are invalid.

Either way, OneSaint has a good point. Don't worry unless you have to... but I know that's hard to do. In the age of Google, we tend to diagnose ourselves all the time; it's why labs don't like to release results to anyone but the doctors.

I wish you luck and hope you'll continue to share what happens as a result of this.

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