Life Changed On October 6

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pancreaswanted commented on Elizabeth's blog post 'Dia-buddies'
"it must be so comforting for them both to know the other is there! lovely and christmas-y, thanks for sharing."
5 hours ago
Elizabeth posted a blog post

Dia-buddies

This morning when I dropped Eric off at daycare, I heard a sweet story that made my eyes tear up.One of the women who oversees Eric's daycare, "Susan", is also a substitute teacher at his school. She was assigned to a kindergarten class last week. One of the students in that class, whom I'll call "Lucy", has diabetes and wears an insulin pump. I've seen Lucy a few times in the nurse's office, and let me tell you, folks, they don't come any more darling than this child: think masses of…See More
10 hours ago
Elizabeth posted a status
"As of this morning... we are now a 2-diabetic household. Eric's dad just got Dx'd with T2D."
Wednesday
Elizabeth replied to niccolo's discussion 'why don't we inject insulin intravenously?'
"I would love to have the answer to this question... but I gotta say, I'm glad we do not inject intravenously. I had an awful needle phobia when my son was diagnosed and while I have managed to get past that, I'm not sure I could have done…"
Dec 9
Elizabeth replied to Kate's discussion 'Disagreement over CGM' in the group parents of kids with Type 1
"Eric had both pump and CGM when he was 3, up until he was 5, when for a variety of reasons (mostly economic but some physiologic) we stopped using the CGM. He has lost pump sites a zillion times, but the CGM came off only once or twice. The lack of…"
Dec 9
Elizabeth posted a status
"My favorite pediatric endocrinologist doing the education thang on the local news http://on.wcsh6.com/1vpW910 #diabetes #dsma"
Nov 19
Mike Ratrie liked Elizabeth's blog post Ketones: the good, the bad, the… misunderstood
Nov 18
Elizabeth commented on Elizabeth's blog post 'Ketones: the good, the bad, the… misunderstood'
"Yes, Mari, of course, Your Diabetes Will Vary... In days of routine activity, any time ketones are above the "trace" level (0.0-0.3, for those who have blood ketone meters) there's potential concern, particularly in someone on a pump.…"
Nov 17

Profile Information

The PRIMARY person in my life who has diabetes is
1 or more of my children
The PRIMARY person in my life who has diabetes has
Type 1 or type 1.5 (LADA) diabetes
How do you hope to benefit from TuDiabetes?
Support, ideas, sympathetic ears, community
Date diagnosed
October 7, 2008
Most recent HbA1C %, date of result (optional)
7.2 (September 4 2014)
Type of treatment/devices you use
Pump
What pump model do you use, if any?
Medtronic Paradigm 522
Enter your website, if any (blog, Facebook, Twitter)
http://www.twitter.com/fenbeast

So here's my basic story

I suddenly became the mother of a child with Type 1 diabetes in an odyssey that started on October 6th, 2008, when Eric was a toddler. Before that date, I'd noticed that Eric was peeing through his diapers at night, that he was really thirsty all the time in the evenings, and the possibility of diabetes had crossed my mind and was lurking there. But October 6 was the day Eric's daycare provider phoned me at work and told me she'd noticed he was thirsty all the time during the day, too. As soon as I got that info, I called the pediatrician and left a message — I wanted Eric checked out. All the drive home I was praying that we'd find out it was something else. But the next day, when I picked up my boys from the daycare en route to the pediatrician (Eric was 18 months, Nate was 3 1/2), I felt pretty sure what the verdict would be. And when Dr. Foster came into the room looking uncharacteristically anxious and said, "Well, Mom, you were right..." my heart just sank.

What I DIDN’T know was that he was already in serious trouble—diabetic ketoacidosis was underway, though you’d never know it to look at him, and the next stop on that train is a place no parent wants to go. I picked the boys up from daycare and went to the pediatrician thinking I’d get my diagnosis and go home with instructions to see an endocrinologist within the next day or two; instead, we were sent straight to the ER, do not pass go do not collect $200, met at the door by the pediatric endocrinologist on call, with me trying to keep Nate under control while listening to doctor explain what was happening, while the Dread Hamster of Parental Fear used my brain for a exercise ball. His blood glucose was 569, that much I remember, and his ketones were high too — the rest is something of a blur. Eric did well, even laughing when we were wheeled through the halls of the hospital on a gurney; considering how sick he was and how terrible he must have been feeling, it shows just how cheery his nature is. And of course Nate was with us and just loved it, although he kept doing little kid stuff like pointing at some guy on a stretcher who looked like he was having a heart event and saying loudly, “Mommy, is that guy REALLY TIRED?? Why’s he lying down?” Or at the person on chemotherapy: “Look, mommy, that guy has no hair!” (it was a woman. Aren’t kids great?) At one point Dr Olshan himself took on the task of keeping Nate locked down while the nurse was attending to Eric with my help, and he asked me if I’d ever before had a $200-an-hour babysitter. Which made me laugh, but also made me think about Eric’s less-than-stellar insurance coverage (but that’s another gripe for another day).

From there we went to the ICU, with tubes and wires and all that stuff. Mark took Nate home, while I got to stay to comfort my little pickle. What followed was an agonizing night in which I got no sleep, had to hold my screaming son down as ICU nurses drew blood and inserted IVs (I’ve threaded sewing needles bigger than his little veins, so it was torture to watch), and was wakened hour after hour to assist as they performed blood glucose and ketone tests. By the time they came for the 3 am round of testing, Eric was so exhausted he didn’t even wake when they stuck him... And I was little better, waking just enough to identify who it was leaning over my son before closing my eyes again. Thank GOD, Eric responded very well to the insulin—by mid-day he was practically back to normal.

We spent 2 1/2 days in the pediatric ward learning how to stick our child with needles, then came home to a completely new reality. We learned about insulin, we learned about needles, we learned about insulin pumps and all their assorted accessories; we learned about highs, lows, ketones, why an antiemetic is a good thing, and the many ways that insurance companies try to dodge paying the bill. I suspect we'll be learning more and more for years to come.

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Elizabeth's Blog

Dia-buddies

Posted on December 22, 2014 at 6:30am 1 Comment

This morning when I dropped Eric off at daycare, I heard a sweet story that made my eyes tear up.

One of the women who oversees Eric's daycare, "Susan", is also a substitute teacher at his school. She was assigned to a kindergarten class last week. One of the students in that class, whom I'll call "Lucy", has diabetes and wears an insulin pump. I've seen Lucy a few times in the nurse's office, and let me tell you, folks, they don't come any more darling than this child: think masses…

Continue

Ketones: the good, the bad, the… misunderstood

Posted on November 15, 2014 at 5:00am 5 Comments

This is going to be a long blog post… but I woke up today feeling like I had to write it because I see so many people not understand the subject. And it’s important for people with diabetes — and parents of children with type 1 diabetes especially — to know what’s going on when ketones are present.

I see a lot of parents saying that high blood sugars and ketones go hand in hand, and that if you let your child’s blood sugar get…

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Year Six = Transformational

Posted on November 11, 2014 at 11:00am 3 Comments

I realized something the other day.

Even as I found myself making progress toward putting the anguish of Eric's diabetes diagnosis behind me, Eric himself is making amazing strides at learning what he needs to know to take care of himself. For instance, just in the past six months, he has:

• Started taking his own blood sugar readings (I had to bribe him, but once he'd done it once, he seemed to really like the…

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I'm amazing. But don't take my word for it.

Posted on October 17, 2014 at 2:30am 16 Comments

At swimming lessons last week, I had an interesting encounter with another mom.

When we arrived at the pool, I did what we usually do: I sent the boys in to change into their bathing suits, then Eric came out to give me his pump and get a blood sugar drawn. He was lower than I wanted him before an hour-long swimming lesson (84), so I gave him some juice and a couple of lifesaver candies to bring his blood glucose up enough to get through the class without a low. I barely noticed the…

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A milestone

Posted on October 7, 2014 at 10:38am 3 Comments

Today is the sixth anniversary of Eric's diagnosis. And you know what? I didn't remember that until I had to run to the nurse's office to give her a new meter (the 5-year-old OneTouch Ultralink meter we'd gotten with Eric's pump gave up the ghost, not unexpectedly). When I signed into the school, I put the date down, and realized... oh.

What's funny is that October 6 and 7 represent a 2-day anniversary of what remains, and hopefully will always remain, the worst 48-hour period I've…

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Comment Wall (126 comments)

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At 7:15pm on October 13, 2014, rick the "Blogabetic" said…

Elizabeth congratulations on being named a featured member of the week.

At 7:53pm on October 7, 2014, Karen said…

Congrats on being featured :)

At 11:40am on September 25, 2014, Linda G said…

AWESOME ELIZABETH!! You're a FEATURED MEMBER!! BRAVA!

At 6:26pm on September 23, 2014, rick the "Blogabetic" said…

Elizabeth congratulations on being named a featured member of the week.

At 11:43am on September 16, 2014, Marie B said…

HAHA, maybe you'll luck out and he'll stay the sweetie. I've heard that such kids exist (j/k, I know a bunch who are)

At 7:15am on September 16, 2014, Marie B said…

Hi Elizabeth, I just wanted to stop by and say how much your thoughtful replies (esp to parents) are appreciated. Thanks for being here!

At 5:12am on July 16, 2014, rick the "Blogabetic" said…

Elizabeth, I do not know what it means to have a child so young with diabetes. I am thankful. Though I grew up with diabetes I was not diagnosed until I was 17.

But I do know a few situations where children have diabetes and live in a multi-child family. I think you did the camp thing about as good as anyone I know. When I was diagnosed I left one month later for a months worth of backpacking in New Mexico. My mom was ok with it because as I said I grew up with the disease and that was my last summer before my senior year in HS.

Had I been younger, with a non diabetic sibling I think my mom would have said almost the very same things you did in that situation. I cannot give you a higher compliment than saying that.

rick

At 6:13pm on July 14, 2014, Linda G said…

GREAT Elizabeth!!! You're a FEATURE MEMBER!! BRAVA!

At 3:47pm on October 9, 2013, Linda G said…

BRAVA ON BEING A FEATURED MEMBER ELIZABETH!!

At 5:32pm on October 8, 2013, rick the "Blogabetic" said…

Elizabeth congratulations on being named a featured member of the week.

 
 
 

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Emily Coles
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Desiree Johnson  (Administrative and Programs Assistant, has type 1)

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Marie B (has type 1)

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