Low-Carb Diets Will NOT Cure Me (or You)

Here's a little disclaimer since people don't seem to be getting the message: This blog is meant for people who have an eating disorder. The word "cure" is not referencing diabetes, rather diabulimia and/or binge eating disorders. Please be mindful of this when commenting.

I am so sick of hearing about "low-carb, low-carb, low-carb." I've heard other diabulimics say it has cured them, I have heard of low-carb diets as advice from people who mean well, and I read a lot about it in the diabetic community in general.

I The American Heart Association recommends at least 100 grams of carbs a day.

Denying your body of the minerals and energy it needs isn't any better than denying your body of the insulin it needs.

I think the draw to this diet for people who have diabulimia is that technically, you can eat as much as you want, lose weight, and not have to make yourself sick. In that way, it sounds like a low-carb diet could actually "cure" diabulimia. Let me be very clear about something.

Diabulimia is an eating disorder.

One more time.

Diabulimia is an eating disorder.

Yup. It's right up there with anorexia and bulimia. It means that diabulimia is not just about not taking insulin.

You cannot cure an eating disorder with diet change. Recovery comes from true self acceptance and love of yourself, regardless of weight or any other imperfections.

If you want to begin your recovery process please seek out a team that consists of a nutritionist, therapist, and a diabetes health care professional.

***** To read more about my journey to recovery as a diabulimic please visit http://mysugarcage.blogspot.com/*****

Views: 1217

Comment by Shawnmarie on December 2, 2011 at 9:27am

I read your entry last night before all the comments below were made and wanted to let you know I totally get it. I recovered from an eating disorder many years ago and thought I had figured out my relationship with food. My T1 diagnosis two months ago has once again brought up lots of issues for me around eating. Just knowing there are ways I could manipulate insulin if I felt I wanted to lose weight is a frightening prospect. I can only imagine how hard it is to free yourself from the disorder once it has you in its grip. So please know there are some of us to totally understand when you say a low carb diet isn't going to cure diabulimia. But it does sound like you're doing the internal work that will help you on your road to recovery.
.

Comment by John Cather on December 2, 2011 at 11:42am

OK, I get it now. I apologize for my earlier rant. I didn't know about diabulimia. I just did a little research and now see the light. I didn't know people did this. I thought you were making up a term and pasting it to low carb dieters. Again, my apologies for not doing my homework before opening up my big mouth.

To MossDog, I disagree. We are a bit off topic here in relation to this thread (now that I understand it), but I have seen and heard of countless complete cures of type 2 diabetes using only low carb. Any time you, or anyone, eats high carb they become insulin resistant. It's the bodies natural response to too much blood sugar. So you are right that the insulin resistance comes back but because it is there for everyone whether it becomes full blown diabetes or not. Anyone who does not want insulin resistance should not eat high carb, whether they are full blown diabetic or not. No one can "do as they please" without ill effects. A lot of the time you don't realize those ill effects but they are there.

Comment by Khürt Williams on December 3, 2011 at 10:20am

Hmm ... tricking one to respond to. Your body needs a certain combination of carbohydrates, fats and protein to provide for its energy needs. However, the typical American diet is calorie rich and nutrient deficient. I either at least 100g of carb per day but I try to eat mostly nutrient dense foods such as leafy green vegetables, nuts and fruits. See Dr. Fuhrman's "nutritarian" style diet.

Comment by joanie on December 4, 2011 at 1:03pm

Thank you for bloging. You are completely correct and you are helping the message get out there. Since I've always been prone to become a Diabetic but never correctly understood this disease; I brought it on for sure with my compulsive eating disorder. I work on both of these issues today, the compulsive eating disorder and how it goes hand in hand with my disease. I must watch my emotions carefully to assist myself with my disease. We need to understand both if we have both condition.

Joanie

Comment by Marie on December 7, 2011 at 5:20am

This is such an important topic, though one we are often scared of talking about. I have often been worried when a low carb diet is advised on forums to people who, from what they have written, may have diabulimia.
This blog by someone who is recovering from it describes her story, I think it shows how going onto a low carb diet didn't help, indeed the obsession with carb counting may have exacerbated things..
http://diabulimiasos.weebly.com/my-story.html

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