A couple of days ago I went on date, now I don't go out very often but being a Single guy, I sometimes find myself going out on a date. While this was officially our first date, I had met her at a party before and we had talked for a while so the subject of my diabetes had already come up in the natural flow of our conversations.

She is in nursing so she is pretty much familiar with what diabetes is and what it entails but I realized on this our first date that knowing about diabetes and seeing diabetes first hand are two entirely different phases of the diabetes life altogether. I also believe that the circumstances are almost somewhat stranger for someone who let say is exposed to it for the first time.

The things we take as second nature to us could be unnerving to someone on that first date so I came up with a few tips to follow when dating with diabetes.

1.Spread the love: Information on living with diabetes and not just general information. For example I always carry my Emergency kit wherever I go and I had an unfortunate Incident where I had to find my meter and everything almost tumbled out. Obviously I had to show her all my gadgets and everything I carry with me.
2.Make it a conversation Piece: I made my diabetes life part of the conversation, I have some engaging stories about some high days that had her in stitches. Do not be afraid to share this with your date, especially if you have to do the inevitable like a quick check of your sugars before you eat.
3.Stick to your Routine: When out on a date you should stick to your regular routine, whether it is the time you take your medications or the time you eat your meals, do not let it make you deviate from your regularity
4.Make Healthy Food Choices: Just because you are out does not mean you cannot make healthier choices, lots of veggies, ask for steamed, baked or broiled instead of fried. Stick to your diet plan. Remember to eat in moderation and take a doggy bag if the portions are higher than normal.
5.Have Fun: Remember dating is about having fun and you should have as much fun as possible.
6.Keep A sharp eye on your sugars: I added this here because I was thinking that one of the symptoms of high sugars is irritability an no one likes a grouch on a date especially a first date.
7.Stress free: Stress needs an honorable mention because it plays a factor especially for guys as you know we are looking to impress the ladies and that comes with its own stressors and eliminating those is key.

These are just a few I could come up with I am sure that there are a few more so you are welcome to add those that I forgot.
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The poor diabetic blog is a resource on fighting diabetes without the aid of medical coverage. It offers tips on management savings and cheaper options to diabetes medications and supplies.
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Views: 26

Comment by Gerri on December 3, 2009 at 5:14pm
This is great! Dating & D come up in discussions frequently & your tips are fantastic.
Comment by Teena on December 3, 2009 at 6:10pm
Vey good tips you got there and pretty practical too. Im sure a lot od singles here (uhh...even those who are not) will love these =)
Comment by Tom Goffe on December 3, 2009 at 11:22pm
It sounds to me like you are right on target. I used to try different ways of managing D on a first date. Hide it, be open, or somewhere in between. In the end, I figured "open" was the way to go, operating on the idea if things got serious it would get more and more awkward to bring it up later. Hey - it is a part of who I am, and that includes having blonde hair, too.

In the end, the "open" policy worked out fine. Been married for 10 years now to a great lady who knew about it from day 1. I wouldn't change a thing.
Comment by Tom Goffe on December 4, 2009 at 7:12am
Comment by Ronnie Gregory M on December 4, 2009 at 11:00am
thanks tom gerri and teena diabetes is part of our lives and introducing it to those who might potentially be included in said life is always interesting.
Comment by Billy Williamson on December 4, 2009 at 11:54am
That's great! i actually just met someone and she is also a nurse. I find that we talk about our jobs and diabetes lots. It does make a pretty interesting conversation piece when both of you are comfortable with it.
Comment by Ronnie Gregory M on December 4, 2009 at 1:54pm
@billy-it is easier when you have someone who is in the business as we say, the learning curve is much better and she knows what to expect from the very beginning

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