A1C readings came back with a 6.3. Having a CGM, a 6.3 feels quite mediocre, although getting a 6.3 before would have felt like ultimate victory. Amazing how this little device changes your perspective so much.

Since getting the CGM, I haven't had an A1C over 7, although I've also been very active the whole time. I guess it is time to start buckling down and aiming for the elusive 5's. That means I have to be less reactive and even more proactive with sugar control. Some days I can get it done, but other days, life gets in the way. The girls need to eat, and I barely have time to cook my own breakfast before running out the door. There have been more than a few occassions when I'd get to work and realize I hadn't taken insulin. A great feature of the pump is that I can then over-correct with insulin and watch the drop, catching it with some extra carbs before I go low. I guess it all depends on how busy work is.

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Comment by Bradford on December 22, 2011 at 7:41am

I feel ya Mike! I have worked hard over the past few years to maintain in the 5s, but twice this year I've been up at 6.1 and just recently, 6.3.
While we both may feel mediocre about it, 6.3 is still an awesome result! And yes, the pump and your CGM are definitely the tools you need to shoot for those elusive 5s :) I say keep up the great work that you've put in thus far, and set your sights on a goal and go get it! I will be right there with you, working my way down again too.

Comment by acidrock23 on December 22, 2011 at 5:27pm

While the pump is neat and I love mine, another way I've found to make it useful is as a "servant" to follow me around and write down what I do. If, for example, I do a meter and test but don't bother eating b/c I'm OK, I can still "log" it on the pump. I got a CGM so I don't do that much of that either these days but getting as much data as possible can, in turn, cook up better reports which can provide clues like "I'm running high every day after breakfast, maybe I should try something else?" and see what happens? I get up at the crack of dawn most of the time so I have time to yutz around and make eggs and stuff. Admittedly, I have a teenager who is pretty self-starting most of the time but the lower carb stuff has sort of wiped out spikes in the AM. I eat toast pretty regularly but try to find brands that are 1) acceptable to a picky teenager 2) light in carb. Lately Bimba soft wheat

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