does insulin therapy make BG management easier?

my father was told several years ago that he was type 2 diabetic...i believe he is pre-diabetic.he has never taken any medication to control his BG and his most recent a1c's are in the low 6's...since my Dx he has been getting his a1c every 3 months like me,before i think he did it about once a year...my WHOLE family has become more health minded since my Dx.they all tell me it's because diet and exercise is all i talk about :) it's an inside joke,a funny one...i think...

my father and i have had several discussions,some rather heated.we talk about being able to manage your BG only through diet and exercise VS. insulin therapy...he never used to check his BG.now he tests at least once a day...i test at least 3 x daily...he sais he has NEVER tested much higher than 200...i have spent whole days trying to knock down some crazy 350 that came out of nowhere...probably trouble with my actual injection method,i'v gotten much more consistent with my technique...my endo has helped me a lot with that...

in my mind i see insulin therapy for a T2 as sort of a last resort.the disease has progressed to a point where diet and exercise are either being ignored or are just not enough...then all the meds for T2's still arent enough...kind of a worst case scenario for your average T2....i am a T1 and spend most of my time concerned about my particular problems but i do talk a lot with my dad about his particular issues.

to the point! our conversations almost always come around to how much easier it would be for him to take a shot if he happened to eat too much or if he set out to indulge...i tell him that he has the benefit of being able to just exercise it off...i have to take the shot and exercise too,splurge or not.

i dont think he wants to be medicated and he actually fears insulin therapy...i'v had to explain to him several times the difference between a T1 and a T2 that happens to use insulin..."insulin therapy does not make you a T1,dad."

there is so much more involved with insulin than just counting your carbs or following your scale...i dont just eat my meal take my shot and go on with my life...mabey some day it will be that easy but for now i watch the clock after i bolus...

are type 2 diabetics secretly jealous that a type 1 can just dose the sugar away?

i know i'm jealous that i cant just exercise the sugar away...i have to inject insulin,even if it's only a few units.

my dad is a little crazy...ex-marine,3 tours in vietnam...he also lived the 70's to the fullest...i think he is a little mixed up about diabetes in general but the talks we have do get me thinking about other peoples lives and how they manage there conditions.

i do have to admit that i'v fallen into a pretty selfish trend with my additude:(

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Comment by RissaMae83 on October 25, 2011 at 8:48pm
Hi Tee Juan Dee -- well .. I am not really sure what I can tell you.. I was diagnosed as T2 -- I was on oral meds for awhile, and then that stopped working (apparently, I have LADA), however, I can definitely tell you that yes, when I was T2, I was a little put off by having to sacrifice foods that I loved to eat.. especially sweets! Although, I've never looked at T1 looking to use their insulin to dose off their highs... but when you did mention it (and I had to think about it), there may be a slight inclination of jealousy that T1's can just "fix" their highs.... however, with my new diagnosis, I am SUPER jealous of T2's who can use exercise and diet to control their diabetes -- and eventually ward off diabetes for the next few years bc of their regime...
Comment by RissaMae83 on October 25, 2011 at 8:53pm
... and since being diagnosed LADA, I am now on insulin and seriously cannot wait to get my pump... and speaking of insulin, the way you have described your father.. he may be scared of going on insulin therapy... honestly, I don't blame him. There was a time when I didn't want to accept my LADA diagnosis and use insulin -- but tell your dad that no matter what type of treatment that a PWD gets, we're all working on a common goal -- and that's to live a longer, healthy life =)
Comment by Gerri on October 26, 2011 at 2:37am
Insulin for T2 is not a last resort & it doesn't mean the person has failed. It's not a worst case scenario. I understand, though, how people feel this way. More endos are putting T2s on insulin early to help preserve beta cells. Don't know if it will help, but perhaps showing your father research on the advantages of T2s using insulin may open him to the possibiity. Of course, oral meds may help him a lot & that's where he'd begin.

Both types suck & both are difficult in their own way. Neither is easier than the other.

He doesn't sound prediabetic with readings of close to 200. That's diabetic, as is his A1c.


Members here who manage T2 without meds. They eat low carb & exercise. Some are on just basal insulin..
Comment by Tee Juan Dee on October 26, 2011 at 3:18pm
just to be clear...my dad is in no need of insulin or meds...he manages his betes with diet and exercise quite well...this makes me very jealous because like rissamae said,his condition can be downgraded just because he follows a strict regime...

also Rissa,the first few months after the Dx ,the pump was all i thought about but i'v learned to live with my injection regiment and i am now very happy with shots,i like my basal and dont want to give it up...i believe i'm shots for life...that said,i wish i could get flex-pens so i dont have to take my cooler everywhere i go but syringes arent that bad...i dont want a pump any more at all!
Comment by RissaMae83 on October 26, 2011 at 5:25pm
Really? Even if that means less shots? Wow -- I think you're the first person I've heard to say that to me -- and good for you!!! I am glad that works for you! I'm still using insulin pens, but the problem with me is that I didn't need a whole unit.. sometimes I only need less that a quarter of a unit to fix my highs -- and with insulin pens, there's just no way of doing that. I find that I'm even more on a rollercoaster ride when I over correct (and that's just because I'm a unit off..) my bolus with pens -- and then I get it up by drinking juice.. and then Im high again. It's sorta an endless wave of highs and lows for me, and honestly, I tired of it -- hence the decision to go on a pump. I am hoping this will help me out for a flat line of bg #s

Wish me luck! =)
Comment by Gerri on October 26, 2011 at 7:00pm
I do injections also. Pens need to be kept cool also. No need for a cooler. Frio wallets are great & keep insulin cool.
Comment by Tee Juan Dee on October 26, 2011 at 7:07pm
pens can be kept at room temp for a month after u open them...according to my endo...i kinda like my playmate...i keep snacks in there too with my insulin..i really havent looked into any of the insulin specific coolers
Comment by RissaMae83 on October 26, 2011 at 7:10pm
Yes -- I was about to say that Tee Juan Dee! My endo and diabetes educator have both told me that once I open up a new pen, then I don't need to refrigerate and is good for 28 days from the time I start using...
Comment by Tee Juan Dee on October 26, 2011 at 7:11pm
rissa...the rollercoaster sucks if i dont need at least 2 units i wont bolus or correct...i exercise...when i wanted the pump i was taking like 6 shots a day...now i take mabey 3...i dont bolus for every meal,especially if i know i'll be exercising...
Comment by Tee Juan Dee on October 26, 2011 at 7:16pm
i feel like diabetes saddles me with enough...do i really want some device plugged into me 24/7 to remind me i have the betes..no,not me..

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