I'm not sure how to start this, so I'll just jump right in. I was diagnosed with diabetes in late Oct 2013, when I received a form letter from my primary doctor about a routine BG result of 127. I had told her before she requested the test that I had eaten breakfast, but that information was not listed on the lab report, and she forgot/didn't check, so technically, my original diagnosis was faulty. However, my A1C was 6.8, so there was some cause for concern.

Once I got the letter but before the follow-up appt, I got a machine & test strips & ran a week's worth of tests following the protocol described here.

My home tests showed that I do have some glucose tolerance impairment, mainly Dawn Phenomenon (fasting glucose over 120 but post-prandial under 140). I already tended to eat a diverse & nutritious selection of foods, but I started being much more aware & careful about glycemic impact. I also added 10-15 min of moderate exercise after each meal (since that has been show to help prevent BG spikes). I've worked for years on psychological issues regarding overeating/restricting and such. While I am always still learning & growing, the principles of intuitive/mindful eating have been really critical and focusing on my overall health & wellness.

So, 3 weeks after getting the original letter, I brought my home testing results to my follow-up appt with the dr. Firstly, in those 3 weeks, my A1C had dropped to 6.1. While I was obviously doing good things, the home tests did show fasting numbers above 120, so the doctor reiterated the diabetes diagnosis & issued me a glucose meter, with instructions to test my morning fasting numbers & 2 hrs after my largest meal and follow-up in 3 months.

She was also very defensive about my concern that the original diagnosis was done via a form letter without any attempt to verify whether the BG number had been fasting. Without going into details, the appointment was horrendous & infuriating. I decided that she is not someone that I want to have on my health care team. So I did some research & selected someone else in the practice to become my primary doctor, and I will have my 3-month follow up with him in a couple of days.

Based on my FG & PPG numbers, it is likely that my A1C will be even lower. The original doctor had said to shoot for FG under 120 & PPG under 140. Well, of the almost 90 days' testing (and without any medications), I had a total of 8 FG readings that were 120+ and 4 PPG's that were 140+, with the highest being 151.

Each time my PPG has been high (>125ish), I try to figure out what choices I made that I could try to do differently. I'm still very much in the stage of figuring out what works & what doesn't work for me. But I think I'm doing pretty well with this, overall.

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Comment by shoshana27 on February 10, 2014 at 12:26pm

congratulations
you know more than we do & most drs

Comment by Angela on February 10, 2014 at 12:58pm

Of course I was upset about the diagnosis. But in the long run, if I have to deal with this condition, I'm glad that it was caught so early (even if it was sort of by mishap). I hope that by being really proactive & serious about managing it, I can delay its progression & complications. Already, I feel better (more energy & less minor nagging pains) than I did when I got my dx.

Comment by Christopher on February 10, 2014 at 1:11pm

Hey Angela, congratulations on your progress! Sadly, you're experiencing what so many of us have to deal with: the ignorance and arrogance of so many in the medical field when it comes to treating and diagnosing diabetes. You're "eating to your meter," which is an excellent approach and highly recommended. There's a good chance that if you're T2 and can tailor a diet and lifestyle change that gets you to non-diabetic numbers doing this alone, you might be able to halt its progression entirely.

Jenny Ruhl has a wealth of information on this and other things on her site. Check it out: www.bloodsugar101.com

All the best!

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