I just posted this to my blogger account (tamraGarcia.blogspot.com) today.

I had my third post-op eye appointment today. It was a normal thing, go in, register, wait, see nurse and have medications, vision, eye pressure tested, wait, get a room, wait, see doc...

My eye pressure is good, 14. I had one question to ask the doctor; I have had a gas bubble in my eye before and at that time I could see shadows and movements through it. This time around, with the second gas bubble, I can't see a thing. No shadows, no movement. I can tell when there is light in a room versus when the room is dark, but that is it. When I told the doctor this, he immediately examined my eye, which was the plan anyway. Come to find out I have a very large hyphema (collection of blood) in the front of my eye that is not letting light get through. This should clear itself up.

On our walk over to the room where he was going to do an ultrasound on my eye, the doctor asked how my pain was since surgery.

"I haven't had much."

"That's good." He was happy to hear.

"Yeah, I've only had to take three of the pain pills you prescribed."

The doctor stopped in his tracks and looked at me very surprised. "That is amazing!"

The ultrasound revealed that everything looks good and is healing well. The doctor can do surgery to remove the hyphema but is sticking to his promise to not put me through any more surgeries...at least this year.

...Oh, and I have to maintain positioning (head down, bent forward at all times) for at least another week.

Views: 45

Comment by Kathy on June 20, 2014 at 2:51pm

When I had the gas bubble, I could see nothing. Then, as it shrank, I was able to see more around the edges.

Comment by Tiki on June 20, 2014 at 4:19pm

The first time I had a gas bubble I couldn't "see" anything, but I could make out shadows and movement. As the bubble shrank my field of vision grew from the outside in. This time I really see nothing but can recognize the difference between light and darkness. The bubble has barely started to shrink and I do have a tiny sliver of peripheral vision on the right side of my right eye.

Comment by Sandy on June 21, 2014 at 3:51pm

I'm so happy to hear you're not having much pain!! That's awesome!! I'm sorry you're going through all of this eye stuff. I'm hoping your blood collection reabsorbs quickly so your vision will return to as normal as possible!! Thanks for sharing your story!!

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