Type-2's will have enough insulin being produced but the insulin receptors on the cells cannot accept the insulin. At the same time insulin is produced, C-Peptides are also produced. Therefore in typ…

Type-2's will have enough insulin being produced but the insulin receptors on the cells cannot accept the insulin. At the same time insulin is produced, C-Peptides are also produced. Therefore in type-2's you will find plenty of C-Peps but the insulin comes to a closed door and drugs have to be taken to open the doors, (the keys). Type-1's don't produce insulin and C-Peps will therefore be low, indicating type-1 diabetes. See below.
The amount of C-peptide in the blood can indicate the presence or absence of disease. For example, abnormally low amounts of C-peptide in the blood suggest the insulin production is too low (or absent) because of type I, also known as juvenile or insulin-dependent diabetes. Abnormally high amounts of C-peptide warn of the possible presence of a tumor called an insulinoma that secretes insulin.
Normal levels of C-peptide may signal that all is well. However, in a person with diabetes, a normal level of C-peptide indicates the body is making plenty of insulin but the body is just not responding properly to it. This is the hallmark of (adult insulin-resistant diabetes). C-peptide, therefore, plays a crucial diagnostic role as regards insulin.
Insulin is a hormone that regulates the body's use of glucose. Muscle cells and other types of cells need glucose to generate energy. The body manufactures glucose from food, mainly carbohydrates. It is the job of insulin to deliver glucose to an energy-consuming body site. There it knocks on the front door and places the glucose into the hands of the occupant. The occupant then uses the glucose to help its master -- the body -- walk, run, throw, lift, and carry out other activities. Football players, mountain climbers and lumberjacks all thrive on the energy glucose provides. Insulin also prevents glucose overload in the bloodstream by lowering the level of blood glucose as necessary. Insulin is released by cells in the pancreas called the islets of Langerhans. JB.

Views: 9

Comment by Peetie on August 14, 2011 at 10:35am
Hi Johnben: I just checked your page to see how you are doing and I came across this blog. Thanks for posting it. I was very confused about the whole C-peptide issue and you have cleared it up for me. Praying that all goes well for you at the hospital.
Joanne

Comment

You need to be a member of Diabetes community by Diabetes Hands Foundation: TuDiabetes to add comments!

Join Diabetes community by Diabetes Hands Foundation: TuDiabetes

Advertisement



REsources

From the Diabetes Hands Foundation blog...

TuDiabetes Is Getting A Makeover!

Written By Emily Coles, TuDiabetes Community Manager. Last summer we surveyed members of TuDiabetes and EsTuDiabetes online communities, and gained some GREAT insights! We learned that our members are happy with the information and support they receive on TuDiabetes and Read on! →

An eye opening experience at @CWDiabetes!

Last month, I had one of the most amazing experiences I have had with technology since I have been living with diabetes. It happened at the Focus On Technology conference organized by Children With Diabetes in Los Angeles (the first Read on! →

Diabetes Hands Foundation Team

DHF TEAM

Manny Hernandez
(Co-Founder, Editor, has LADA)

Emily Coles
(Head of Communities, has type 1)

Mila Ferrer
(EsTuDiabetes Community Manager, mother of a child with type 1)

Mike Lawson
(Head of Experience, has type 1)

Corinna Cornejo
(Development Manager, has type 2)

Desiree Johnson  (Administrative and Programs Assistant, has type 1)

DHF VOLUNTEERS


Lead Administrator

Brian (bsc) (has type 2)


Administrators

Lorraine (mother of type 1)
Marie B (has type 1)

DanP (has Type 1)

Gary (has type 2)

David (has type 2)

 

LIKE us on Facebook

Spread the word

Loading…

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.

© 2014   A community of people touched by diabetes, run by the Diabetes Hands Foundation.

Badges  |  Contact Us  |  Terms of Service