Had a really bad the day after Thanksgiving. Checked my BG before going to bed did a small bolus and changed my set. Got up early do do a little black friday shopping - it was early didn't get a chance to check my BG - but I thought no big deal was not going for long and took a banna and counted the carbs and did the appropriate bolus. Was a busy morning people everywhere. Started not feeling well and got that acidty smell that tells you that you are high sugar wise. No big deal I thought so I did another bolus on the fly. Continued not feeling well did another bolus. Got home in poor shape checked myself and was hospital high. Immeadiately took a large shot to compensate and over the next 3 hours two more shots to get to normal levels.

So I ripped out the new site and the new cannula was just outsde the skin. and not under the skin. So I probably went atleast 12 hours without any insulin.It was one those spring loaded vetical Animas sets where once it's removed from the device you can't see if the cannula is in or not. Unlike the the Comfort Sets that are mannually inserted. First and foremeost let me state I was at fault for running out of the house without checking myself - quite honestly such little things can kill you. Never take things for granted even the simple things. Now dealing with a a little eye bleeding from the incidence which I hope will go away over the next week or its back in for some laser touch up.

I like others that I have met online have gotten to the ripe age of 55 and have been a diabetic for a really long time. In addition I am a third generation diabetic. So I think I fairly knowlegable on the disease. I am guilty of getting to familar and complacent with the disease. It's something you just can't do and survive.

.

Views: 5

Comment by Doris D on November 30, 2009 at 3:49pm
I still do my infusion sets manually after highs just like that one your talking about. Sorry for your trouble. Now wait let me say the way I do it is from an old fashion way of thinking it may not be best for others!

Comment

You need to be a member of Diabetes community by Diabetes Hands Foundation: TuDiabetes to add comments!

Join Diabetes community by Diabetes Hands Foundation: TuDiabetes

Advertisement



REsources

From the Diabetes Hands Foundation blog...

Diabetes Among Hispanics: We’re not all the same

US Hispanics are often portrayed in the press as a single, monolithic group. But anyone who has spent any time in San Francisco’s Mission District or the Bronx can tell you, we’re not all the same. Now we’re finding out Read on! →

Diabetes entre los hispanos: no somos todos iguales

Traducido por Mila Ferrer.    A menudo los Hispanos en Estados Unidos son retratados en la prensa como un solo grupo, monolítico. Pero cualquiera que haya pasado algún tiempo en el  Mission District de San Francisco o el Bronx se Read on! →

Diabetes Hands Foundation Team

DHF TEAM

Manny Hernandez
(Co-Founder, Editor, has LADA)

Emily Coles
(Head of Communities, has type 1)

Mila Ferrer
(EsTuDiabetes Community Manager, mother of a child with type 1)

Mike Lawson
(Head of Experience, has type 1)

Corinna Cornejo
(Development Manager, has type 2)

Desiree Johnson  (Administrative and Programs Assistant, has type 1)


DHF VOLUNTEERS


Lead Administrator

Bradford (has type 1)


Administrators

Lorraine (mother of type 1)
Marie B (has type 1)

Brian (bsc) (has type 2)

Gary (has type 2)

David (dns) (type 2)

 

LIKE us on Facebook

Spread the word

Loading…

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.

© 2014   A community of people touched by diabetes, run by the Diabetes Hands Foundation.

Badges  |  Contact Us  |  Terms of Service