Finally, I found a place where to express my opinion about the Dexcom 7. I call it little monster. Yes, it is a monster but monster can be good and not too good.
I got my Dexcom last year, about one year ago now and I still don't like it too much and I tell you why?

My Cons about DExcom
- The receiver is too big, bigger than my pump and cellphone.
- The receiver is very uncomfortable to carry on, it should be something like a watch in many colors.
- It drives me crazy! my glucose had been in 60 and the receiver says 344!
- I have to calibrate it more than three (3) times a day.
- The transmitter is also too big, where you hiding with your swimsuit? I feel I have a LEGO sticked in my skin..
- The adhesive for the transmitter cover a big area. It should be clear or skin color.

My Pros about Dexcom
- Yes, It helps you when your glucose is getting low or high but you can't trust it at all.

I have read that Animas and Dexcom are working together to combine these two machines. I love my pump, but I hope the new one doesn't come bigger. It will be great have both machines in one, and I hope the technology helps them, so we can see it smaller and more efficient.

Views: 245

Comment by Karen on February 2, 2012 at 7:22pm

Thanks for posting as I was thinking about trying the DEX, as I tried the MM CGMS and did not like it for all the same reasons, plus the site was killer to me.

Comment by Jim on February 2, 2012 at 8:02pm

I'm a little confused. Tell me again why "It will be great have both machines in one,"? I think I would save the money and not use it if I disliked it. No sense wasting the money on something you don't like or don't trust.

Comment by Nell on February 2, 2012 at 8:30pm

I just started the dex about a month ago. When I did the one week test, the test model was so close to my OneTouch readings that I thought it would be great. But I am finding that in "real life" it is not reliable for lows or highs. For example, I just noticed that my dex read 221. I checked the bg and the 1-touch says 396. So there you are. That is quite a difference. [Yes, I forgot to bolus for some hot chocolate.] The lows are not reliable either, which is really why I wanted it. Dex fans will tell you that doesn't matter, that its purpose is to show trends and not real numbers. And they will remind you that the Dex reading is always 15 minutes behind the BG tester reading.
I got it in the hopes that the new model will be out early this year and that it is supposed to be more accurate for lows. That may be false hope on my part.
The dex seems to be fine for those who keep their BGs within 70 to 130 mg. And a lot of people on this site seem able to do that. I am not one of those. I am going to try it another month or two and see if the FDA moves on the next model. If not, I am not sure what I will do.

Comment by smileandnod on February 3, 2012 at 9:07am

Hi Bella, I understand your frustrations and it's a personal decision that everyone must make. I've had my Dex about 5 months now and it's been a love-hate relationship but I would not give my Dex up for anything.

While the Dex has its flaws, the benefits outweigh the shortcomings for me. I've learned how to use the Dex to my benefit to better my control.

Because I have become more hypo-unaware, I have alert alarms set on all the down arrows on my Dex. This has saved me many times when my Dex beeped with one or two arrows down and allowed me to treat before I crashed quickly into a dangerous low. If I had not had the Dex, I may have been oblivious until it was too late to treat.

The other main benefit I've seen with the Dex is to see which foods cause me to spike and for timing of insulin. Once I got a handle on how to make it work for me, my lines have been much flatter with the Dex.

Everybody has to figure out which tools work best for them. The Dex, with all its flaws, has been a blessing for me.

Comment by MossDog on February 3, 2012 at 9:08am

I think it all depends on the person. No one will be able to say the Dex is right on with their finger sticks all of the time- the technology is not there. For me though, about 90% of the time I am +/-20% of my fingerstick (which is the best your meter can give you!!). While I certainly cannot trust it to fine dose, if I am reading in the 200's and do not have immediate access to my meter I can bolus a unit knowing that even if it is wildly off I would not be in too much trouble. The biggest help for me is 2-3 hours after the meal. The Dex will show me when the "break" from stability (relative that is- when the food entering my system gets overpowered by the insulin dose) is and my blood glucose starts dropping. Without the Dex I can't be aggressive about this.

Comment by Bella on February 5, 2012 at 12:30pm

Thanks to all for your comments. Its good to know how Dexcom 7 works in other people. All your feedbacks are very helpfull for me.

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