After receiving my proper reprimand from my endo about her protocol for filing a complaint regarding my care, there seems to be some good news. I did get a call from the D-center. Matters were looked into and although I know some of the information given to me about the pump training I attended was inaccurate, an apology was given (from someone higher up) and I was offered to attend the correct training session. So contrary to my endo's belief, mistakes were made, whether or not she is willing to admit them is another issue.

But I must admit, part of me still wants to send my endo a follow-up letter( and I still may). Physicians should be held accountable not only to how they treat their patients medically, but also in how they speak with them as a human being. Their failures are not mine and will not be made mine. Perhaps I should say my "former" endo's failures are not mine.

Views: 4

Comment by Debi Henson on May 11, 2010 at 12:16pm
I agree completely. It's unusual to have an Endo with bad information, even bad practice. But to have classes with misinformation, that is not acceptable. It's good to have you (I assume a long term diabetic) in the class!

P.S. Was it a Doc with Aetna? Or Minimed classes?
Comment by Mike Ratrie on May 11, 2010 at 2:35pm
m4p,

Glad you got some positive reaction from the D-Center.

I think you should definitely write the follow-up letter to your endo (former or otherwise). I would recommend two things. First, write it and then put it away for a week, then revisit it. Second, in the initial writing work on removing your emotions from it.

As an aside, from the service provider side of the fence (not a medical business though) --

When I was the manager of a retail store I was greatly concerned with keeping my customers happy. Among other things this was because it was always easier to keep a current customer then to have to find a new one. As a result we had a set of "rules" that we followed:

1 - Acknowledge the complaint and thank the customer for bringing it to your attention
2 - Ask for the customer's "facts" (true or not, they are facts to the customer)
3 - Promise to investigate and follow-up with the customer on the results
4 - Ask the customer for what they would consider a "fair" resolution
5 - Investigate
6 - FOLLOW-UP and propose a solution to the customer
7 - Thank the customer again for the complaint.

By following these simple rules, we kept customers that would have left our store (and complained to others). We also learned how our actions were perceived and modified our procedures and sometimes our personnel to better serve our customers. Many of these customers became our advocates and brought their friends to us.

Fair Winds,
Mike
Comment by mother4peace - Christine on May 12, 2010 at 5:26pm
@Debi - this was with my endo. More details are on my original post
http://www.tudiabetes.org/profiles/blogs/dont-rock-the-dcare-boattoo

@ Judith and Mike - Thanks for the encouragement to continue.
Mike , your advice about the letter is something that I did do. I wrote it a week after it happened and even after I received a follow-up call from the center I still feel the need to send it. Nothing was addressed regarading the behavior of my endo but part of that is because only she and I are the ones who know what her behavior was. Time that the mask is pulled off and the ugliness of her actions exposed. I hope she can take what I say and try to get something good from it to help her with her the patients. I wll take your advice and try to remove the emotion from it, but I do think that a small part of that I will leave in because part of my diabetes experience is my experiences that I have had with this disease and having a father with the same disease not to mention the horrible doctor before this endo.

Thanks again for the good advice. :)

Comment

You need to be a member of Diabetes community by Diabetes Hands Foundation: TuDiabetes to add comments!

Join Diabetes community by Diabetes Hands Foundation: TuDiabetes

Advertisement



REsources

From the Diabetes Hands Foundation blog...

Meet The 2014 Big Blue Test Grant Recipients

  This year Diabetes Hands Foundation has pledged US$35,000 in Big Blue Test grants, continuing its support for programs aimed at providing lifesaving supplies, medical tests, treatment, and patient education to people living in need who have or at risk Read on! →

Kim Vlasnik: The Patient Voice

  Kim Vlasnik, you NAILED it! In this video, Kim Vlasnik takes our breath away as she describes what its like to be a person with diabetes. Fortunately, Stanford’s Medicine-X Conference gives ePatients, like Kim, a chance to speak since we carry the Read on! →

Diabetes Hands Foundation Team

DHF TEAM

Manny Hernandez
(Co-Founder, Editor, has LADA)

Emily Coles
(Head of Communities, has type 1)

Mila Ferrer
(EsTuDiabetes Community Manager, mother of a child with type 1)

Mike Lawson
(Head of Experience, has type 1)

Corinna Cornejo
(Development Manager, has type 2)

Desiree Johnson  (Administrative and Programs Assistant, has type 1)

DHF VOLUNTEERS


Lead Administrator

Brian (bsc) (has type 2)


Administrators

Lorraine (mother of type 1)
Marie B (has type 1)

DanP (has Type 1)

Gary (has type 2)

David (has type 2)

 

LIKE us on Facebook

Spread the word

Loading…

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.

© 2014   A community of people touched by diabetes, run by the Diabetes Hands Foundation.

Badges  |  Contact Us  |  Terms of Service