Now short before my fourties I had a full exam at my Diabetologist who is also specialized on Cardiology. The checkup revealed that I am really lacking fitness. For my age the heart rate is too high and the output generated in the cardio excercise is not where it should be. To me this is no surprise because of my job in the IT business. This is going on for years and my doc always appealed to me to change something about it. This time he did not appeal - he made the following order: 1 hour of sport on 5 days a week.

To me this is really a big change and challenge because I also need to reduce the number of lows. This level of sport is time consuming but I am willing to go there. So for the last three weeks I am on this new schedule and I am still adjusting to it. I expected that it will be not very easy and my numbers show that. Next is the standard deviation and the rise that came with the new schedule:

In general I am exercising late (around 8pm) and I always eat additional carbs for it. The problem is to find the right balance. The carbs should be present for the activity but they should not be digested much later. For the night itself I will eat one bar of chocolate to prevent the low that will develop from the refueling muscles (around 4am). Next you will see how the mean glucose for every hour of the day for the last 30 days (red) looks in comparison to the 30 days before (blue). The rise is dramatic for me and I hope it will settle.



The point is that this high level of sport is awaking my liver. For that I really need to find a solution. After two weeks I have seen the first high spikes after sports. Unregular highs I would explain with some sort of liver reaction. It appears sport is motivating my liver to change its behaviour: you need some carbs - here you have it. So far I can not rely on that but I assume I will have to find a balance between external carbs and the expectation that the liver will help me out with some dumped glucose.

This is trial and error I suppose. On the positive side I feel much better now. It is really worth the effords.

Views: 73

Tags: change, in, lifestyle, liver, sport

Comment by karebear1966 on May 17, 2011 at 4:25am
I had to tweak my workouts also. I cant tell you how frustrated I was having to eat a chocolate bar after my workout just so I could drive home.I dont want to eat crap, especially after working out so hard! What I do now that seems to work for me is I drink Glucerna DURING my workout . I has slow releasing carbs that level me out, and I dont have to eat garbage afterwards!
Comment by Brian (bsc) on May 17, 2011 at 5:17am
There are more complex effects related to exercise. I find that exercise causes hormone changes, rise in cortisol and adrenaline leading to blood sugar rises during and after exercise as well as overnight releases of growth hormone. After weightlifting, I'll often have bad case of Darn Phenomenon, probably made worse by the growth hormone. With practice, your body will adjust to the exercise and you will figure out how to manage things. It will get much easier.
Comment by SuFu, Ph.D. on May 17, 2011 at 6:47am
I had to quit working out at night for the same reasons. Now I either go early in the morning or over the lunch hour. It allows me to add extra insulin following the workout to suppress the post-workout spikes and be awake for the latent onset hypoglycaemia that goes along with intense workouts.

I also agree with bsc. The hormonal changes can really mess w/ your BG. Adrenaline can cause it to spike. However, (again like bsc said) it's the overnight hormonal secretions that will really mess with you. Androgens and growth hormones secrete in a circadian rhythm, with max secretion between 2-4 am (on the average). It's a big time adjustment phase to get it all figured out. My basal rates are 20% higher from 0200-0600 than they are for the rest of the day to cover for the GH timing.

Keep it up, once you get going on it and start seeing the results its like a drug. My wife and I were talking about this a couple days ago. For me, exercising is a true addiction. I love it and need to do it. You might not hit that level (i'm borderline obsessive), but it does make you feel good when you're done with a great workout.
Comment by 1type2go on May 18, 2011 at 8:25pm
Hey I'm glad I've spotted you blog Holger.
I just started Back on this road,I've been out of the fitness loop since tearing my rotator cuff four years ago.

Now :I've been taught the greatest tool for replenishing glycogen is honey.In a shake or on it's own and this tip is not for the low carb'r. As for the spikes after peak hi intensity ,this is the time to be blousing to eat and you will not need as much as you think.Muscles will absorb all you can eat backed by a 45min workout.

The other train of thought is to not carb load before so much as to intake 30-50 grams of carb 1\2 hour before, so you burn fat as well as build muscle then at the end of the workout bolus if needed for the High carb protein shake to replenish.

These high carbs and the protein is burned up or SOAKED up by your sponge muscles in no time. I have had to resort to slow sipping a Gatorade YUCK, but it is a great tool to keep on truckin'

All of this is considering the Dawn Phnom and the liver dump I have had to deal with as well.
Donovan

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