To my dearest new friends here at TuDiabetes, I bid you a very late good morning from Canada.

For the last half a week, I have been put under some unusual stress dealing with issues surrounding my post-graduate studies and a financial hoop-la of excitement. I may come from a place where we have "free" medical assistance, but that doesn't mean everything is free. I've gone broke over the past couple of years trying to keep my head above water with this "Diabetes" thing and be in university. My mental health has deteriorated, many relationships have been pushed to the sidelines, and there have even been paradoxial moments where I can't go to work because I'm sick, but I have to go to work because I'm sick and need the money. To all this I say, "Alright". This is my word of frustration and moving on (well, as best as I possibly can some days).

I have recently discovered that humor can be a great tool when dealing with something as tragic as a chronic condition. I have been told by people that I am funny. I have also been told by people that I am far from funny. I would like to meet in the middle with a bourgeoisie sense of being, though I seem to find its more like a tilt-a-whirl. Irregardless! Making jokes in the face of a terrible situation has often given more light into my deeper feelings on an issue, diabetes related or not. On an especially terrible day, I enjoy making diabetic pick up lines (ie. Are you happy to see me or is that an insulin pump in your pocket?)More to follow on that point.

Now that I am a young career, blah blah blah. I work retail because there are no real jobs anymore. I have found that I have a copious amount of extra time on my hands that I did not have in school due to the massive amounts of studious behaviour required. More time is not a good thing, especially not when you are prone to anxiety and depression, as so many of us are. I have decided that a new hobby is in order! First things first, I wanted to become a better speech writer and public speaker, so I started attending ToastMasters. Wow, was I the youngest one there by a couple of decades! Not that I have a problem with middle-aged men and women and most are very pleasant and supportive, but I needed to find something with people my own age. Thus, I've waylaid my public speaking career. In an attempt to meet more people my own age I hit the internet. Drinking, bars, nightclubs, etc. Maybe the occasional activist group or lecture series at the university, but in all actuality not really my cup of tea this year. So I did what all lonely 20-somethings my age do when they move to a new place and are lonely (and single), I joined a dating website. I'm sure that this could be and is a great way to meet new people, but not for me. I'm too intense and ask poignant questions about the state of their relationship with their mothers. It's a good question! Okay! I did meet a nice fellow, we had gone out a couple times and things were heading in a really good direction until he had some tragedy in his life and decided right now was not a good time to date. Oi vey! Can't a girl get a date with a less damaged boy these days! And being a diabetic, I find dating incredibly hard. It's like you get into a new relationship with someone and you have to school them instantly on the things to look for and how to treat certain things, as well you have to explain the occasional mood swings associated with hyper- and hypoglycemia. This guy was good; he was already educated on the matter! What more can a girl want! And he was an excellent kisser! Alright. Moving on.

So the dating thing really wasn't panning out as a hobby or a way to meet people my own age. But I'm still a bored diabetic looking for something to fill my time so I don't swoop into bad habits and copious amounts of television watching. So tonight is the night folks, I'm taking the big leap into hobbyville. I've decided to take sewing lessons. Yes, an excellent hobby because people always appreciate quilts. No, not a good way to meet people my own age for dating and other purposes. But this is still good for me. It will be a way for me to de-stress, which will help my glucose levels, I might be able to share a few dirty jokes about diabetics with some nice older women who then might set me up with their grandsons (see what I did there), and I get that hobby that will keep me from falling into bad habits that won't help me with my diabetes.

All in all, its Monday. Maybe tomorrow I'll take up fire dancing.

Happy LADA Awareness Week everyone!

Views: 103

Comment by Marie B on October 15, 2012 at 12:10pm

I've been quilting since the late 70s. I have made many friends everywhere quilting, and find it a really good stress reliever and way to take your mind off your d. I'm past president of a large quilting guild in New York State. Let me know if you have any questions about it.

Comment by Pastelpainter on October 15, 2012 at 2:25pm

Craftspeople are so very friendly, hope you enjoy your sewing classes.

Comment by Angelica Koder on October 17, 2012 at 9:01am

Lol I have started hooping as a hobby and have a blast with it!!! Check it out!!

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