Oh well...
Today I wanted to pre-order my test stripes for the next 3 month...
600 stripes, and they're never enough! But now my diabetologist is on holidays...
I'm worried to go to my "normal" doctor instead because I already had asked him for stripes last week! :-(
So, I know you can't send me test-stripes ;-)
But... Does anyone of you know how to save them?
I guess I'm kind of addicted to testing ;-)
When I was a teenager, I didn't wanna test at all, and now it's too much...
I use to snack around, and them I'm testing... Or I justed think I'm low and I have another test...
I know these plans with 3 meals a day, testing once before and once afterwards...
But is there a trick to make me actually do this?

Greetings, Astrid.

P.S.: By the way, I think it's unfair that our stripes are limited!

Views: 12

Comment by Gerri on March 31, 2010 at 9:46am
Are you trying to get more strips than the Rx allows? Great that you're testing a lot! Insurance will only cover so many even if you get an Rx from more than one doctor. Some are good about writing a prescription for a lot.
Comment by Kathyann on March 31, 2010 at 9:55am
I test before meals and bedtime, unless I'm feeling low. Then I can go through extra strips. Once you know what food does to your blood sugar there is no point constantly checking your Bgs.
Comment by Nyxks on March 31, 2010 at 10:17am
I get as many strips as I wish to get, they come in 100 packs for what I get (and 100 lasts me exactly 29 days, maybe more if I forget to test a couple of times in a day) .. but I do not need a script for them all I have to do is get the drug mart to write up a script receipt to give to my insurance and keep for my taxes.

I tend to best upon waking up, before breakfast, after breakfast, before lunch, after lunch, before dinner, after dinner, and before going to bed ... but I also test before driving, so if I am going to run out I do a test and while running around I'll test if my tummy starts yelling at me that its hungry (which for me is a partial sign that I might be going low when I get freaky hungry). I'll also test before going out for a walk and when I come back from a walk, and I always test before starting a work out and after working out, so its possible that on top of the 8 times a day of regular testing that I'll add in another 8 tests depending on how hectic the day is for running around. Max in a day I have gone though was 25 strips and even with that I ended up going low after going to a 5 km walk.

Best I can say for you is to ask your doc next time for an open ended test script, that or for a script that has unlimited refills, if you cant get either then see if he will give you one for 1000 strips at a shot. Other wise I have no idea about what you need for your own testing purposes.

I know my own endro is pleased about my testing and how I am taking it seriously - saw my GP today and she offered to give me a refill script for any of my diabetic meds and inulin if i was running low (wasn't running low, but I got them anyhow from her, since it can't hurt to have them on file at the pharmacy).
Comment by Debi Henson on March 31, 2010 at 10:30am
Not sure what you mean by 'saving' strips. Are you trying to limit your usage? You don't say if you are using an insulin pump, but if you are, you can set the "BG reminder" for two hours after you eat. That way you'll only test when you're reminded and before each meal.

My doctor wrote my prescription as follows: "Check blood sugar 8 times daily". So I receive 8 boxes of 100 at a time, and they last me as long as 100 days. Truth be told, most days I only test 5-6 times daily, but it's good to have the choice when I'm sick or just not sure of how things are going.

By the way, I'm surprised your specialist isn't having you test first thing in the morning and last thing at night. I hope that is a reflection of how well you're doing!
Comment by Kristin on March 31, 2010 at 12:10pm
I started testing a lot less by testing in patterns (still I test 7-8 times a day):

before breakfast (fasting)
1.5 hours after breakfast
before lunch
1.5 hours after lunch
before dinner
1.5 hours after dinner
before bed

So that is 7 fixed times per day. Then I test if I am ever feeling low. My doctor convinced me that this is "enough" because testing twice within an hour doesn't provide a lot of extra information. I used to test 10-12 times per day, but then I was snacking a lot and trying to catch highs. Eating on a schedule helped me to reduce the number of times that I test per day, but I'm not sure how easy that would be for you. I could not eat on a schedule when I was a student!!
Comment by Kristin on March 31, 2010 at 12:10pm
Also, test strips are actually not a prescription item :)
Comment by Devon on March 31, 2010 at 12:22pm
Astrid- I was a chronic tester too! The way I got myself to test on a schedule was setting the alarm on my cellphone. I don't have a watch or I'd set that. I have it set to go off before each "meal time" and then after. I'm actually only testing 4 times a day now at the suggestion of my endocrinologist because I tested WAY to much and let it consume my life (too much for me- others it's fine). Anyway- I don't test "off schedule" unless I feel funny and maybe either high or low.
Comment by tmana on March 31, 2010 at 1:01pm
At least in the US, test strips are available over-the-counter, without prescription. You just go up to the pharmacist counter and ask for them. Now, if they're not on your prescription, you do have to pay full price for them (about US $110 per box of 100)... but the point is, they're not unobtainable.
Comment by Cathy Jacobson on March 31, 2010 at 5:45pm
I agree if you are trying to limit the number of times you test by "saving them" I'd set an alarm or timer and test ONLY at those times. I've set the alarm on my cell phone for my afternoon dose of metformin, and since I've done that I haven't forgotten it. Give the alarm a try. As for the number, I've never been told I've used up my alotted number of strips....maybe you need to ask for more and have your doc write the script for more....
Comment by Astrid L. on April 1, 2010 at 8:49am
Thanks a lot for your good advice! : )
I'll really try out setting an alarm and limit myself to testing only then.
It's interesting that there are refillable prescriptions in other countries!
In germany, the insurance companies have fixed the amount to 600 for 3 month...
I can still buy them without prescription, but they're very expensive...
So I'll get on a plan!
It feels good that there are other test-addicted ones, and that you've changed it! ;-)
The thing is, my doctor is happy about me testing a lot, but he just cannot give me more!
Well, time to use them wisely...

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