Yes I know today with the pump, life MAY BE A BIT EASIER, but the basics remain the same. There will be people who pay no attention to this. Your bad luck! If you want the truth about diabetes read this .
I post this letter from time to time because it seems to help a lot of newbies and not so newbies to live better with diabetes. Hope you think so also. . I have 48 years of diabetes at 5 needles per day and 10 blood tests daily and have some nice complications.
Some friendly advice for those who want it!
This is for those starting or on the go with diabetes and not sticking to the rules! You may not feel anything now but it sure as h*ll will get you later. Diabetes will give you time to live, under what circumstances, is up to how you, control your diabetes right FROM THE START!! A good life can be had, having diabetes!!!!!

That is really true, it is an opportunity that will give you a good diet to live by, preventing to be overweight and because you are forced to do your exercise you will remain slim or slimmer than you would be, if you carried on the old way.

There are some "IF's" attached to this. Nothing comes without effort. You will ALWAYS have to stick to your diet, you will ALWAYS have to take your medication at THE SAME TIME, you will ALWAYS have to do your exercise, you will ALWAYS have to test your BLOODSUGAR so that you know you stay as much as possible where you want to be. Keep complete records of your testing. Sinning sometimes is ok as long as it is not on a regular basis. On the pump you will have more flexibility

Now here is something you don't want to hear! No matter how well you stick to the rules you will run into regular disappointments, to the point that you may want to pull the hair out of your head, because good adherence to the rules doesn't ALWAYS results into good control of your diabetes.

On the other hand, if you decide NOT to follow the rules you will run into complications of diabetes that could shorten your life. It could blind you, kidney failure will make you have to experience dialysis, you could lose toes, feet and yes even legs! I could go on and on , but won't. To come to an end here,..... if you stick to the rules, your life can be a pleasant experience in spite of disappointments, and you will avoid all or most of the complications.

See it as an opportunity for healthy living, and discipline in your everyday life. A big chance to live longer and better than you would possibly have had without it!
Your dietitian will help you with what to eat and how much probably with counting yourcarbs. 48 Years ago we had to learn by estimating and making a good guess what has much sugar in it and that way I do my eating still today. Don’t panic!!! It all will come allright soon. On this board you can ask everything and learn fast. Basically it is more a matter of amounts that matters. Smaller amounts and avoid obvious sugary things, but bread and potatoes are also slower sugary things so SMALL AMOUNTS!

The very best to you from,

JohnBen. PS. If you have read this, will you please say so in the reply, so that I know I did help some people with this? Thank you.
</</b>

Views: 33

Comment by snowangel66 on February 1, 2009 at 2:46pm
its so true though! i've been waiting for someone like you to write this; with the new medical advances diabetes is SO much easier to handel than it was years ago, so with good diet, proper medication and exercise there really is no excuse I don't care what anyone says. congratulations on your wonderful A1C and everything you have overcame!

keep spiffy!

-Jill
Comment by Kathy on February 1, 2009 at 3:16pm
I read it. And it was good - very good. Thank you!
Comment by clarence haynes on February 1, 2009 at 4:01pm
Thanks for giving us a testimonial that should wake up a lot of diabetics that are in denial.A lot of people do not pay too much to this 'silent killer" because there is no physical signs that tell you have something wrong with you,so it cannot be serious. Using your same guidelines I try to tell them if ignored, they are 'walking timebombs'. People like you are ROLE MODELS can show by example, diabetes can be a learning lesson than a death sentence. Thanks for expressing it in a way, those that listen will live longer if they learn as much as they can about their diabetes will ive LONGER, if they follow the BASIC RULES, you mentioned. In CANADA,,living where INSULIN was discovered, JULY 30 1921. I am trying out a novel way of networking. I call 5 diabetics, EVERYDAY. It serves 2 purposes, it makes SOMEONE'S DAY, and could SAVE A LIFE, then I ask them to call 5 diabetics and so on. Just imagine small groups of diabetics, connecting, supporting each other, solving each others problems and a social group that enjoy things together, walking, going on day trips, enjoyinga whole new world and living a healthy lifestyle. Maybe you could sar something similar in your area? AMIGOKIT is our way of diabetes awareness. Check out www.restorethebantinghomestead.com On JULY 30 annually, I will be contacting insulin-users, to join me, in silence, to say THANKS for INSULIN giving hundreds of millions of us a healthy lifestyle We will be selling BLUE ROSES as a fundraiser to turn the BANTING HOMESTEAD, into a diabetic camp for children.Our choice of the BLUE ROSE was made because on of its meanings is 'ATTAINING THE IMPOSSIBLE. the AMIGO mission. Keep In Touch and THANKS again for giving me added reinforcement and at 91 reasons to keep telling newly-diagnosed reasons they should start out the RIGHT road to a long,healthy, enjoyable journey of being a HAPPY DIABETIC. clarence.haynes@sympatico.ca
Comment by Cynthia F. on February 1, 2009 at 4:56pm
It's amazing to hear how diabetics lived years ago! Reading postings from you and other older members have inspired me to take better care and be in control of my diabetes.
Comment by nel on February 1, 2009 at 5:51pm
You said it ...Our health providers are our consultants...we have to choose which road we will follow .And be thankful to live in North America .
Signed "newbee" , ha, ha person with type 1 diabetes for 26 years without side affects and a most supportive husband
Comment by Donna Heun on February 1, 2009 at 6:12pm
Thank you so much for your straightforward advise, possitive attitude and for being such a role model for so many. I am hoping by taking the best possible care of my diabetes, I will be able to avoid those terrible long term complications you mentioned but I know there are no guarantees.
Comment by nel on February 2, 2009 at 9:26am
I like to add to my previous comment to have patience with those of us , who for one reason or another have great difficulty following the basic rules of diabetes management or are unsuccessful in the prevention of diabetes.
Comment by Twixcookie on February 3, 2009 at 2:17pm
But what if you cannot get insurance...........
Comment by nel on February 3, 2009 at 6:13pm
And this is a very good reason to speak with our political leaders ...do not give up .
The Canadian DiabetesAsociation and their advocacy ambassadors are in constant touch with the Feds and Provincial counter parts. I am not sure , who is advocating for you , if you live in the US ...ADA /JDRF ??
Contact them and see if you can help .
Comment by Gerri on February 22, 2009 at 10:03pm
Enjoyed your advice. Thanks!

Comment

You need to be a member of Diabetes community by Diabetes Hands Foundation: TuDiabetes to add comments!

Join Diabetes community by Diabetes Hands Foundation: TuDiabetes

Advertisement



REsources

From the Diabetes Hands Foundation blog...

Diabetes Among Hispanics: We’re not all the same

US Hispanics are often portrayed in the press as a single, monolithic group. But anyone who has spent any time in San Francisco’s Mission District or the Bronx can tell you, we’re not all the same. Now we’re finding out Read on! →

Diabetes entre los hispanos: no somos todos iguales

Traducido por Mila Ferrer.    A menudo los Hispanos en Estados Unidos son retratados en la prensa como un solo grupo, monolítico. Pero cualquiera que haya pasado algún tiempo en el  Mission District de San Francisco o el Bronx se Read on! →

Diabetes Hands Foundation Team

DHF TEAM

Manny Hernandez
(Co-Founder, Editor, has LADA)

Emily Coles
(Head of Communities, has type 1)

Mila Ferrer
(EsTuDiabetes Community Manager, mother of a child with type 1)

Mike Lawson
(Head of Experience, has type 1)

Corinna Cornejo
(Development Manager, has type 2)

Desiree Johnson  (Administrative and Programs Assistant, has type 1)


DHF VOLUNTEERS


Lead Administrator

Bradford (has type 1)


Administrators

Lorraine (mother of type 1)
Marie B (has type 1)

Brian (bsc) (has type 2)

Gary (has type 2)

David (dns) (type 2)

 

LIKE us on Facebook

Spread the word

Loading…

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.

© 2014   A community of people touched by diabetes, run by the Diabetes Hands Foundation.

Badges  |  Contact Us  |  Terms of Service