Why does basketball make Arden's BG rise?

Last week during Arden's quarterly Endo appointment I brought up an issue that I had identified but couldn't figure out. I explained to our nurse practitioner that when Arden exercises her BG falls. Riding a bike, running around, recess at school, really all of the her physical activities decrease her BG... except sports

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Comment by acidrock23 on January 29, 2013 at 6:22am

Adrenaline would be my guess for a rise. I've "treated" lows while I'm running by sprinting. Similarly, pushups/ pullups seem to give me a pretty big boost, although these are more ephemeral than highs from cheese fries

Comment by Holger Schmeken on January 29, 2013 at 6:48am

It is the adrenalin and the high activity of the muscles. The muscles go into anaerobic state because they need oxygen to burn the glucose. At some point the liver will kick in to help the muscles to maintain their activity. I am not sure but if I remember correctly it is the muscle mass that will release their deposits. These will be converted in the liver to glucose causing the spike. With some aerobic activity afterwards like running or biking for 30min the spike can be consumed. In aerobic state the burn rate will normalize allowing to effectively utilize the spike that has build up.

Comment by acidrock23 on January 29, 2013 at 4:59pm

I wonder too if there might be a "superstructural" element in excitement/ competition figuring into it too? One of my friends used to run cross country and *always* accelerates at the end of runs. I am more running to the pace of my watch and am 9 years older than him so I'm like "whatever" but he's definitely got the competition thing going on. He mentioned once that his old coach said "don't finish behind the other guy" and they all sort of ran that way.

Comment by Cth07 on January 30, 2013 at 5:21am

I would have to agree with the prior posts. When doing routine workouts my bloodsugars are pretty easy to control after reducing my basal. However, if I do strenuous activity, I see a rise at first then it quickly falls. My endo says theres not a good way to treat it. It usually doesn't last long for me and bolusing only exacerbates the low. "acidrock" mentioned something interesting, I too have noticed,when excited(public speaking, stress, excitement,etc) I get high in the upper 100's-low 200's.

Comment by Scott on January 30, 2013 at 10:30am

I wanted to thank everyone for the thoughtful replies. I think we are figuring this out... be well,

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