Episode 23: D.I.Y. Pancreas System

Dana Lewis is one of the creators of the DIY Pancreas System, or DIYPS.

In this episode Corinna Cornejo and Mila Ferrer talk about the promise and perils DYIPS represents.

Diagnosed at age 14 with type 1, Dana Lewis had the usual experience of years of frustration of dealing with diabetes devices that did not communicate with each other. She often imagined a system that would take data from each device, run it through the algorithm that every person with diabetes uses in their head dozens (or hundreds) of times a day, and automate some of the decision-making process. In late 2013, this became a reality after someone shared their code to help pull data off of a CGM in real-time. Dana and her now-husband Scott Leibrand used the CGM data to create a decision-assist system they called #DIYPS, the “Do-It-Yourself Pancreas System”.

We share highlights from Emily Cole’s interview with Dana Lewis in this podcast. You can find the complete interview in the TuDiabetes archives..

 

Everybody Talks Diabetes Podcast Corinna Cornejo

Share This:


Live interview with Dana Lewis, creator of Do-It-Yourself Pancreas System (#DIYPS)

Diagnosed at age 14 with type 1, Dana Lewis had the usual experience of years of frustration of dealing with diabetes devices that did not communicate with each other. She often imagined a system that would take data from each device, run it through the algorithm that every PWD uses in their head dozens (or hundreds) of times a day, and automate some of the decision-making process. In late 2013, this became a reality after someone shared their code to help pull data off of a CGM in real-time. Dana and her now-husband Scott Leibrand used the CGM data to create a decision-assist system they called #DIYPS, the “Do-It-Yourself Pancreas System”. #DIYPS took CGM data and, with Dana entering information about insulin delivered by her pump and carbohydrate information, processed the data to provide real-time predictions – and alerts – to help her know when to take action. (#DIYPS also had louder alarms to wake Dana up at night, as she sleeps through CGM alarms – this was one of the key drivers of developing a system.)

After a year of using #DIYPS and with collaboration from the wider #wearenotwaiting community, they were able to take the #DIYPS algorithm and “close the loop”, using a raspberry Pi and a Carelink USB stick to automate the process of uploading data, run it through the algorithm, and if needed issue temporary basal rates to the pump…then read the data, and perform the process automatically over and over again. Dana wanted to find a way to make this type of DIY effort available to more people more quickly (and help fill the gap between now and when a commercially available artificial pancreas comes to market in 2017 or 2018). This is how the #OpenAPS movement was born, with a goal to make safe and effective basic Artificial Pancreas System (APS) technology more widely available. #OpenAPS is a number of things: a toolkit to help people communicate with their diabetes devices; a reference design for a closed loop system; and a series of basic documentation for those who are choosing to build their own OpenAPS system.

Dana can be found online at @DanaMLewis, #DIYPS, and #OpenAPS on Twitter. You can read more about the #OpenAPS movement and get links to the documentation at OpenAPS.org.


Jeffrey Brewer discusses Bigfoot Biomedical’s Automated Insulin Delivery System

Bigfoot Biomedical has developed a fully functioning, automated insulin delivery solution for the treatment of Type 1 Diabetes (T1D). By integrating its FDA-approved insulin pump and the leading continuous glucose monitor (CGM) with a smartphone app and a comprehensive, cloud-based data platform, Bigfoot enables a safer and less costly way to treat the millions of people living with T1D. Founded by proven entrepreneurs with track records of innovation and value creation, Bigfoot is creating a durable business of scale, and meeting an important unmet health need. Bigfoot’s roots were chronicled in Wired Magazine and its prototype system, which has been used in the real-world for the past two years, was described poignantly in this blog post by the wife of Bigfoot’s co-founder Bryan Mazlish. Bigfoot was also recently featured in the WSJ.

Jeffrey Brewer is a Founder and CEO of Bigfoot Biomedical, a Silicon Valley company developing the world’s first automated system for the treatment of T1D. For the past thirteen years, since his son’s T1D diagnosis at age seven, Jeffrey has been a thought leader and influencer across the T1D community. As a volunteer, donor, and International Board Member for JDRF, he launched the JDRF Artificial Pancreas Project in 2005, and later served as CEO of JDRF. In the role of CEO, Jeffrey forged financial partnerships with industry to drive research and development of insulin delivery and glucose monitoring technologies. He spearheaded US regulatory reform in the area of automated insulin delivery, and elevated the organization’s strategic priorities to include health care policy, reimbursement, and access to technology for people with T1D. Prior to his work in T1D, Jeffrey founded two successful technology start-ups – CitySearch and Overture / GoTo.com – both of which later became publicly traded companies. Jeffrey served as CEO of Overture which was acquired by Yahoo! in 2002.


Live interview: smartphone-based artificial pancreas? Introducing inControl, by TypeZero

1pm PT, 4pm ET, 9pm GMT

What time is this where you are?

Join us HERE at the time and date of the event.

The folks at TypeZero have created a suite of products that aim to significantly reduce the burden of blood sugar management for people with diabetes.  They include inControl, which is a smartphone-based artificial pancreas solution that automatically controls insulin delivery, inControl Advice, which is a mobile-based advisory system that generates real-time recommendations for meals, basal rates, bolus calculations and exercise decisions, and inControl Cloud, an analytics and support system that can provide the resources you need as life changes.

We’ll be speaking with 3 members of the TypeZero team:

Patrick Keither-Hynes is a Founder and CTO of TypeZero.  Previously he was an Assistant Research Professor at the UVA’s Center for Diabetes Technology (CDT).  He is the creator of the Diabetes Assistant (DiAs) Artificial Pancreas platform used in more than 15 clinical trials since 2008.  Prior to UVA, Patrick founded Brooktrout Technology, a manufacturer of advanced telecommunication  hardware and software products.  Patrick holds a PhD in Physics from UVA, an MA from Columbia University and a BSc from MIT.

Molly McElwee-Malloy is a nurse and diabetes educator with professional experience diabetes at UVA’s Diabetes Education Management Program, UVA’s Center for Diabetes Technology (CDT), American Association of Diabetes Educators, College Diabetes Network, and the Charlottesville Free Clinic telemedicine program.  Molly has 17 years of experience living with type 1 diabetes. She has been a participant, a study coordinator and researcher involved with artificial pancreas trials with the CDT.

Chad Rogers is a Founder and CEO of TypeZero.  He is a serial entrepreneur who has an extensive background in the development of start-up companies both as an investor, management team member and consultant across a number of high tech sectors. Chad has led and worked for a number successful medical technology and software companies including Hemosonics, AMP3D, Global Emergency Group, Aliph/Jawbone, Axiomatic and InterTrust Technologies.  Chad also has a background in venture capital and private equity investing (Fundamental Capital, Maywick Capital). Chad has an MBA from Haas/UC Berkeley and a degree in Commerce from the McIntire School at UVA.


TuDiabetes Live interview with Dr. Richard Insel, Chief Scientific Officer at JDRF

Richard Insel, M.D. oversees the research strategy at the JDRF, the worlds’ largest funder of type 1 diabetes research with an annual research budget over $100M that is focused on curing, treating, and preventing type 1 diabetes. Prior to joining JDRF in 2003, Dr. Insel was founding Director of the Center for Human Genetics and Molecular Pediatric Disease and Professor of Pediatrics and Microbiology/ Immunology at the University of Rochester Medical Center. During his 26-year affiliation with the University of Rochester Medical Center, he held several positions including, Director of the Strong Children’s Research Center, and Chief of the Division of Pediatric Immunology, Allergy, and Rheumatology, Acting Chair of Pediatrics. His research program at the University focused on immune responses to bacterial vaccines, including polysaccharide and protein-polysaccharide conjugate vaccines, and B lymphocyte immunity. Dr. Insel received pediatric and immunology training at Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, St. Mary’s Hospital, London, England, and the Center for Disease Control and is certified by the American Board of Pediatrics and the American Board of Allergy and Immunology.
Among other topics, we’ll be discussing recent news of JDRF’s support for Janssen Pharmaceutical’s Disease Interception Approach to the prevention of type 1 diabetes.

Category: Nonprofits & Activism
Uploaded by: Diabetes Hands Foundation
Hosted: youtube


Live Interview with Grace Murphy, 10-year-old Bionic Pancreas trial participant

Grace and her mom, Nancy, will be joining us fresh from Grace’s summer camp for kids with diabetes, where she got to try out the Bionic Pancreas for ONE WEEK!

Grace has had T1D since 2011 and uses an insulin pump and continuous glucose monitor to manage her diabetes. Ever since she was diagnosed, she has continued to be very active in soccer, dance, and she has even completed two Triathlons and she plans to do more.

The Murphys met Dr. Ed Damiano at the 2014 Children with Diabetes – Friends for Life Conference in Orlando, FL after his wonderfully informative and inspiring presentation on the Bionic Pancreas. Nancy spoke with Dr. Damiano about Grace participating in his upcoming clinical trial for T1D children ages 6-11. Grace very bravely agreed to participate. The trial was scheduled to begin just two weeks later at the Clara Barton Camp in Massachusetts. Grace successfully completed the official screening process then Mama Murphy scrambled to make all the travel arrangements and get Grace enrolled at the camp. (It was a lot of work!)

On July 20th, Nancy dropped Grace off at Camp, where there were about 100 kids at camp, of which 12 girls were in the study. (A study with the boys will be coming up soon at Camp Joslin.)

Nancy also has type 1 diabetes, for almost 45 years, and can speak to the incredible advances in T1D care from the time of her diagnosis to Grace’s test-run of the BP!

Category: Nonprofits & Activism
Uploaded by: Diabetes Hands Foundation
Hosted: youtube