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Comment by *~*Wisewords on September 2, 2008 at 4:49am
> why is it that lows always happen at the most inconvenient times.

Murphy's Law might be one answer, but the practical side is that when you are under an emotional strain, as well as hyper-active over some issue, you are likely to get low.

> I've been crashing during a job interview,
on a date,
while giving a presentation to a client. . .


Okay, which one of those is not an emotional strain? Your heart is beating faster. You are producing extra adrenalin. If you didn't get low, that would be abnormal. Best thing would be to eat or drink something extra before starting any of those activities. About 4-6 oz. of fruit juice or one of those miniature candy bars should be enough. It might take trying different quantities of carbs to see what works best for you.

> Nothing liking sweating profusely and acting all spacey during an interview and having to explain why you seem a little off. which brings a good question. do you think people notice that something is wrong as much as you think they do in those situations?

Well, just a wild guess here, but you didn't get the job, did you? Of course people notice if you are "sweating profusely and acting all spacey",
especially if you call it to their attention by way of explanation. No explanation is not better, but either way, it is a catch-22 situation. You are just not going to win, unless the employer has diabetes and understands what it means to get low. If not, he might not believe you. Those symptoms could also be associated with an alcoholic or drug user. You're not the only one one applying for the job. Why should he be bothered?

What you need to to do, as I said, is have some carbs before the interview, or other presentation. If it was me, I would also check my BG before taking the carbs. If your Blood Glucose is high, no need for the extra carbs. If you are already low, then 12-18 gms. may not be enough. Depends on how low.

Now, on a date, you certainly don't want to appear to be a sweat-hog, or spacey. Even if the girl is understanding, she is not necessarily going to want to make-out with someone who has a shirt that is soaking wet from sweat. And, for any other extra curricular activities, that is also exercise. Have some carbs before you begin.

Even if you are just on a casual date with someone, you can't keep your diabetes a secret. But, you will be able to find out how caring the person is, and how much interest they have in you, if you explain to them about your diabetes. That is different than with an employer on a job interview. They are not allowed to ask about diabetes, or other health areas that are not directly related to the job, such as a taxi driver, or an airline pilot. For most jobs, tell them after you get hired. But have a normal blood sugar during the interview. Same for the girl! Start off with a normal blood sugar. If she makes you low, then you can get something, else, with carbs!
Comment by Jamie on August 30, 2008 at 6:14pm
I have experienced this too many times to count! I have wondered the same thing Brian!
Comment by Brian on August 29, 2008 at 10:28pm
why is it that lows always happen at the most inconvenient times. I've been crashing during a job interview, on a date, while giving a presentation to a client... it's sucks period. Nothing liking sweating profusely and acting all spacey during an interview and having to explain why you seem a little off. which brings a good question. do you think people notice that something is wrong as much as you think they do in those situations?
Comment by Steve Manwaring on August 29, 2008 at 10:18pm
glucose tabs are the best hands down, sugar comes back to haunt me with some stomach discomfort and acute blood sugar peaks and further complications.

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